the flick

What more need be said? It is, yes, as good as you've heard. What a shame that the ticket situation will keep it out of the reach of the general theatergoing public for another year or three.
Rehearsing my plays is a really different experience, for actors, than most plays. I think it was the actor Matt Maher, of The Flick, who said something like "it's like playing in a very small sandbox, but in that you have a lot of freedom."
"You really have to look at the whole picture and see whose story is being told, in terms of geography, gender, class, race. I also think a big problem is not doing work that's experimental enough."
This is for everyone who has lost the Today Tix "Fun Home" lottery multiple times.
Annie Baker, in The Flick, has drawn three disparate loners in dead-end menial jobs; engaged them in often aimless-seeming banter, as opposed to meaningful discussion; and keeps them at it for three-plus long hours.
Wallace Shawn's darkly sublime three-hour play--and worth every devastating minute of it--The Designated Mourner was done
It's been a packed month of culture. I finally made it down to the Barclays Center for Mumford and Sons, and the weekend before I caught one of my favorite bluegrass-based acts, The Punch Brothers.
Like The Flick, the new drama Detroit '67 is by a talented playwright. Both pieces have their flaws. But both artists have created vivid characters we want to spend time with.
Is there anything wrong with The Flick? I've wracked my brain to see if anything is, and I've come up with one glaring lapse: There's no broken seat.