The Giving Tree

Remember Shel Silverstein's classic story The Giving Tree? In it, a female tree gives everything -- her apples, branches, even her trunk -- to this little boy she loves. She has a total martyr complex; it's messed up! So I started wondering, what if the genders were reversed?
My old book and I went down the stairs and curled up with three children under a blanket on the couch. The Giving Tree I read loudly, so excited to share this special book from my childhoodwith them. Within four minutes, two children were sobbing uncontrollably and one (the smallest one) had run away to escape the mayhem I had created.
We live in an age of questioning, however -- Ask the author! Tweet the showrunner! Q&A after the screening with the director
Did you know that Seattle is one of the only major cities in the U.S. that has a vast network of urban fruit trees?
I admit I have never read a smidgen of the Harry Potter books. I would have been a hopeless Muggle in the Hogwarts School
From the "Twisted mind of Shel Silverstein," Funny or Die re-imagines the children's classic The Giving Tree as a horror
There are moments, such as circumcision, when it is hard to feel secure about God's commitment to humanity. But such is true about every relationship -- there are moments in which we doubt an equal return on our emotional investment.
As I have learned writing about parenting over the years, we develop intense opinions and some dysfunctional relationships with the stories we read (or refuse to read) to our children every night.
Every Thing On It, published eleven years after Shel Silverstein's death, arrived yesterday. Homework was instantly abandoned. The Girl Who Hates To Read simply had to dive into this collection of 139 poems.
It's Earth Day, and in order to celebrate, we asked you what you'd be reading, or recommend reading, to recognize the day
Many books make me cry when I encounter them for the first time, although fewer these days than during my mascara-smeared
You're probably familiar with Johnny Cash's rendition of "A Boy Named Sue," but did you know it was written by beloved children's poet Shel Silverstein?
I recently had the honor of addressing the Fellows of the New York City New Leaders Council as part of their 2010 Institute. My topic was "Lessons in Non-Profit Management and International Development."
Middle school students across the country provide "hands-on" support for Haitian earthquake victims by assembling hundreds of health kits for an international aid organization.