the goldfinch

The director behind “Brooklyn” will bring Tartt’s tome to the screen.
All writers begin as readers. This is where we fall in love with story. We are addicted to that feeling. You know the one
Over the last few years, I've been writing fiction. For decades, I've been a psychiatrist. As a novelist, I now write with a reader's sensibility, and read with a writer's eye. I'm struck by the degree to which fiction and psychology share certain crucial elements.
Donna Tartt's The Goldfinch has its admirers and detractors. But what can we say about the sensibility of an author who writes a novel based on a sui generis work by a l7th century painter, Carel Fabritius, at the same time naming its central character after the brother of a famous post-Impressionist painter?
Ian McEwan says long books are an irritating trend. Here's why he's wrong.
Donna Tartt’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Goldfinch is set to become a feature film, as Warner Brothers has acquired
From its start in the early 18th century, the novel as a genre has always resisted easy definition. Samuel Johnson, literary critic and author of the first comprehensive English dictionary, defined the novel in 1755 as "a small tale, generally of love."
Vanity Fair recently ran an article titled "It's Tartt -- but Is It Art?", an irritating headline for an only slightly less
If summer, for you, means the chance to find a beach and lose yourself, for once, in a piece of writing longer than an email, never fear -- we've done the hard work for you and checked out a whole bunch of this year's hottest reads.
Popular culture references can be a shorthand way of conveying vivid images. In their own unique way, they can enrich the read, if they're not over-used. Incorporating the names of people, products, films and television shows within the story can bring immediacy to the narrative.
The Goldfinch felt like it wasn't quite long enough. Don't get me wrong, the ending was satisfying, I just wanted to linger in the rich work that Donna Tartt created.
Ah! The joys and tribulations of being surrounded by stacks of books at my bedside, my husband's bedside, books tucked into every available nook and cranny, piled high on every tabletop and stacked double on every shelf, making it impossible to navigate around safely.
The Goldfinch--both the Donna Tartt novel and the 17th century masterpiece by Fabritius--is much in the news lately, the
h/t The Gallerist Recognize this dreamy, sullen bird? Come on, book nerd, this 17th century Dutch painting is just calling
I just finished reading what I believe is the novel of the year -- The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt.
Tartt discusses how long it takes her to produce her work (about 10 year per book), and the toils of writing very long books
Who wrote it? The New York Times: "Ms. Tartt has made Fabritius’s bird the MacGuffin at the center of her glorious, Dickensian
Little, Brown acquired The Goldfinch almost five years ago, with a 2012 scheduled release date. The novel is about a young