The Hateful Eight

Pineapple Inside Out Cake dotted with Bryan Cranberries, Jennifer Jason Jujubees and Brooklyndor Truffles served a la mode
Iñárritu's film of deific vengeance was one of several critically-acclaimed movies of the year serving up revenge. But its most obvious comparison is with Tarantino's The Hateful Eight, the other snow-filled, revenge-driven, quasi-Western released on the same day.
The new Sight & Sound features my ten-page interview with its February cover star, Quentin Tarantino, and they have graciously allowed me to excerpt a portion of the extensive Q&A here.
Jerry Seinfeld took the stage last night at the Beacon Theatre for the first time in a long time. The excitement coursing through the audience was palpable. I found myself giddy with anticipation and when he appeared onstage after a theatrical post-opener blackout, it was hard to believe that he was there in the flesh.
How can I be a hater? I asked Walton Goggins. He gamely made a frame around my face with his hands: "That's all it takes. Get a hater to let you in."
Oh, wait; QT is a middle class white kid from LA? As in Django, Tarantino uses Jackson to spew his repugnant fantasies on
The Hateful Eight features ten characters interacting with one another, and the moral distinctions among them are not always sharply etched. This raises the question, which of the ten constitute the hateful eight?
Tarantino's films can only really be compared to each other, and the Hateful Eight serves as an excellent progress report for how Tarantino has and hasn't evolved as a filmmaker.
The live stage read was truly historic because it was not only the first time in Hollywood history that a screenplay written by QT was shared with the public before it was made into a film but it was also shared before he was able to even finish it due to a scandalous script leak.
If I wanted to spend three hours hearing fake cowboys say the N-word in the snow, I'd change planes in Calgary. I'm also sort of done with hilarious violence, and whatever irony there was to the way Tarantino employs it, the surprise wore off in about 1998. Maybe we could all use a break.
For me, The Hateful Eight was a mixed bag. The performances are first-rate, though the music was overly heavy at times and it occasionally worked against what was happening by overpowering it to make it appear that more was happening than actually was.
The eight gunslingers in Quentin Tarantino's The Hateful Eight really are hateful, so why do we like watching them so much, and so long -- 3-and-a-half hours -- give or take, including an overture and intermission.