the king and i

Jelani Alladin and Matt Doyle reimagine “We Kiss in a Shadow” from "The King and I" for those unable to "express who they are."
The Grammy Award winner also shared her thoughts on the rapper's unsolved murder case.
After you've had your mind blown by the grounds, you'll be delightfully surprised by the refurbished dining options on the
If you want to contact me, you can find me on Twitter @CaraJoyDavid. I also welcome emails at carajoy@gmail.com. Please do
Nevertheless, her uncredited talent again took center stage when she became the musical voice of Audrey Hepburn's Eliza Doolittle
So many musicals to see, I know; but the show, which remains in exquisite condition, now strikes a tone -- emotionally, not just musically -- that has been absent in recent renditions.
O'Hara's operatic roots date back to her years in college at Oklahoma City University, where she was trained by acclaimed
The U.S. Foreign Service has attracted some very talented people over the years and many of those are the spouses of Foreign Service Officers. Julia Child is one notable example.
"I'll be resting in February so my arrival in New York will be somewhat delayed."
For many, The King and I is remembered as a lush, exotic, and large-scale musical about the improbable romance between a British school teacher and the King of Siam. But in actuality, this musical is a battle between sexism and racism (and no one wins).
There goes another year in New York with magnificent stage performances. Some performers in the past year have excelled in exceptional storytelling far more than others. A season full of diverse characters ranging from female revolutionaries, sexually curious teenagers, a glittering tornado exit, underappreciated siblings, a one-man band, a Latin pop star, a ton of toe-tapping music, and star-turning performances. As we start ramping up to 2016, I look back at my top 10 theatrical performances of 2015.
As a child, you most likely sang "Do-Re-Mi" or maybe even "My Favorite Things." And chances are you watched the film version of The Sound of Music, an adaptation of the 1959 Broadway musical about a nun-in-training who becomes a governess to seven motherless children in an Austria about to enter World War II.
On a soggy evening on the last night of May under two large white tents set up on pier 26, I sat down with throngs of people at one endless table for the ambitious (RED) Supper.
On Sunday, June 7, famed Broadway actress and fan favorite, Kelli O'Hara (who I profiled here, last year) was finally recognized by the Broadway League and the American Theatre Wing for her remarkable contributions to the stage, taking home her very first TONY Award following a total of six nominations over several years.
It was particularly disheartening to witness the absence of Jeanine Tesori and Lisa Kron as the historically significant first all-female team to break through and write the Tony winner for Best Musical: the adventuresome, dazzling Fun Home, based on Allison Bechtel's book based on her life.
It was a evening of stars at the 69th Annual TONY Awards last night, with some surprise wins -- rather, vindication for dedicated fans who were excited to see favorites win across categories. The little musical that could, which began at the Public Theater in SoHo and has now swept the TONY Awards just a year later.
This year, however, two things intrigue me: My kids' first-time stake in the proceedings, and Fun Home. Lea and Sara have seen a lot of Broadway theater this season. As a result, they feel personally invested in their Tony connection to You Can't Take It With You, On the Town, An American in Paris, Something Rotten!, The King and I. Each show is real to them.
If you ask me, On The Town, which is currently slightly trailing both other contenders in my Tony polling, deserves the win. I, like most, was worried when the show was announced for that barn of a theater, but director John Rando proved the doubters wrong.