The Last Ship

Photo by Diana Ragland You co-host a radio show- The Apollo Night LA- which is aimed toward spotlighting indie music artists
Veteran's Day is a good time to ask how it can be that while so many TV shows and movies find inspiration in the sacrifice of our servicemen and women -- and yet find so little opportunity to hire Veterans to tell these stories?
If you ask me, On The Town, which is currently slightly trailing both other contenders in my Tony polling, deserves the win. I, like most, was worried when the show was announced for that barn of a theater, but director John Rando proved the doubters wrong.
Other than the people who, I don't know, get a show up every day, the Tony nominators are pretty much the most important people in theater. But who are they? And when do they recuse themselves?
Fret not for the Broadway season of new musicals, dear friends. Even if, as rumors have it, a summer (post-Tony) opening is announced for Hamilton, all is not lost for this season of Broadway musicals.
I have never really liked cabaret (small "c"). I didn't know this years ago. When I first started writing about theater, I thought it would be great to see actors I liked in solo performances. Then I started going.
The thing Broadway producers don't seem to fathom (as reported in Patrick Healy's article in The New York Times January 7th) is that musicals by their very nature are not always feel-good events. And so The Last Ship will inevitably sink on Jan. 24 after a four-month run.
In his first-rate autobiographical musical The Last Ship, Sting -- also Gordon Sumner, son of a ship builder -- has come full circle, after a fashion.
Two things happened in theater yesterday that had me thinking -- The New York Times reported Sting was going into The Last Ship, which he wrote the score for, and The Country House closed.
Antica Pesa, which has a sister restaurant in Italy, serves top-notch Roman fare in a muted Williamsburg-cool setting that feels like the culmination of the neighborhood's increasing blend of hip and high-end.
We owe it to our vets -- and the American people -- to take steps to usher more veterans into the film and television business -- on set, in production offices and in the writer's room.
Sting's new Broadway play The Last Ship opened this past Sunday. Sting is the most recent '80s rocker to indulge in the big bright lights of Broadway. The last folks to delve into it were U2 with Spider-Man Turn Off the Dark.
Every year I hear about the death of the new musical. Wholly original shows -- or, hell, just shows with new scores (it's hard to be truly "original" these days) -- get bad reviews and people act like there will never be a new musical again. It's not altogether consistent or logical when this hand-wringing occurs.
At its core, The Last Ship poses a religious quest for redemption: Father Jim (Fred Applegate) hears Gideon's confession of sins of the flesh, drink, and foul talk. But hey, this father has a few foibles of his own.
I love the fall theater season. First, fall is my favorite time of the year in the city. Second, the fall theater season is chock full of new offerings, but the pressure to see them right away is less than it is with spring offerings, as the Tony Awards isn't as imminent.
Travis Van Winkle's twin passions of acting and service make for a very contented man. But this man who is willing to sleep in jungles while pouring concrete and who took knife and stick training to portray a Navy SEAL has a surprising ambition.
I was unsure what to expect when interviewing Chris Sheffield, and I must say, I was more than impressed! He's humble, well spoken and truly has a love for his craft.