Thein Sein

For too long the Burmese people could only look to the future and hope for change. Today they have a chance to enjoy the opportunities that the rest of us take for granted. Hopefully now, after decades of conflict, the future finally has arrived for Burma.
The election represents a critical milestone for this fledgling democracy; however, Myanmar's future political, social, and economic trajectory depends heavily on the transfer of power and ensuing formation of government and how the new ruling party is able to govern.
YANGON, Nov 8 (Reuters) - Voting began on Sunday in Myanmar's first free nationwide election in 25 years, the Southeast Asian
Trying to predict the outcome of the election has been deemed by at least one Myanmar-based media outlet as "lunacy," however, three scenarios are emerging as the most likely outcomes of November 8.
The feud between the two rivals became public when security forces surrounded the USDP headquarters in Naypitaw, Myanmar.
Burma's President Thein Sein and ethnic armed groups recently endorsed a draft nationwide ceasefire agreement (NCA), which could bring an end to 60 years of ethnic conflict. The interim accord is the result of torturous negotiations over several years. However, the peace process is far from complete. Pressure on the parties is still needed for a final accord.
The acquisition of energy has become a dominant influence in China's foreign policy orientation generally, and has been a driving force in its relationship with Myanmar in recent years.
Does the country's future lie with Min Aung Hlaing or with Than Shwe? It's a question Myanmar will have to sort out for itself--but, in the meantime, the U.S. could be doing much more to tip the scales towards reform.
When he visited Washington, D.C. two years ago, Burma's new president was being hailed as an "Asian Gorbachev." America's capital rolled out the podiums and cocktail receptions because it appeared a "Burma Spring" was underway -- or at least a winter thaw. But has the former general turned out to be the reformer everyone hoped?
Returning to Myanmar after a quarter century, one is confronted constantly by reminders of how much the country has changed.
Friends of liberty worldwide should offer aid and support to Burmese activists seeking to transform what remains an authoritarian system. Such assistance best comes outside of the U.S. government, lest democracy promotion be seen as yet another tool of American foreign policy.
The staff members gathered in the museum gallery as the moment came for their loved one to be carried downstairs. The deputy director and other museum staff were crying.
Last month, Myanmar's President Thein Sein asked the state-run National Human Rights Commission to carry out an investigation
In Burma, if one were to mention "the election" on the street this morning, the listener would likely not conjure up concern for the productivity and potential of Obama's final two years holding office, but rather of the possibility of Aung San Suu Kyi holding it and being able to create durable and sustainable reconciliation in a divided nation.
Though the priority of Obama's trip is to attend the regional summit, other pressing issues of bilateral ties between the United States and Myanmar are expected to be discussed.
Chris Lewa, the director of The Arakan Project, a research and advocacy group that monitors Rakhine State, told IRIN the number of Rohingyas that have fled western Myanmar since 2012 has now topped 100,000.
That there has been major change happening is certainly true. But much more needs to be done, and as quickly as possible in some areas. The very nature of human rights suggests (or certainly should suggest) that they are universal and irrevocable.
Speculation remains high in Myanmar as to if and when opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi will travel to China, which was one of the strongest supporters of the previous military government and remains highly influential in the country's affairs.