theological education

Theological education is in crisis. By itself, that's not new news. What's newsworthy is exciting new progress on the problems that's now coming up with solutions -- real, viable solutions. Tinkering with the old structures isn't enough anymore.
After listening to a recent episode of the podcast Homebrewed Christianity about the ten not-so-shocking things you learn in Religion 101, I thought I would share what Journalist and Adjunct Professor Greg Horton and Trip Fuller spoke about and add in a few of my own.
The spectrum of Christian thought in Christian history is wider than what is preached from church pulpits in modern, Western, mainstream Christianity. The problem with this gatekeeper mentality by the church is that it prevents a fuller education of the audience.
The Candler School of Theology taught me that I was learning in order to give life to others. Today, I am struggling with the value of such education when the state is preparing to kill one of the graduates. How could this happen? Where were we? Maybe we were in prison when she was there.
Every tweet, interview, Facebook post and letter speaks to Kelly's willingness to not only pursue peace but to minister to other inmates, sharing hope and light from a place of internal resilience.
Traditionally, someone thinking about seminary would go talk to his or her college chaplain or his or her local pastor. But what happens when you're out of school and you don't go to church and you have no access to anyone who might help you discern what to do in your life? Not much.