Theory of Everything

  I was reminded recently that we live in a Catch-22 Universe. What makes it a Catch-22 is that no one is qualified to penetrate
Three great unsolved mysteries remain, and they are the same riddles asked by ancient Greek philosophers: What is the universe made of? Where did the universe come from? How do we know what's real?
"I would say if you're woken up to any news at 5:30 in the morning, it's usually bad news," Bruce chimed in. "So, it was
Michael Lemonick talks with Ricky about whether or not Stephen Hawking would be famous were if he didn't have ALS.
As a tech historian, I am pleased as punch that Hollywood has finally focused its blockbuster, Oscar-bait attention on British scientists.
As he puts it: "...death is a loss... but...living too long is also a loss." It's a question of which we prefer, a shorter more vibrant life, or a longer one in which we eventually will have to cope with the challenge of a slow decline.
"The Theory of Everything" already has a steady stream of buzz following its premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival
"It looks like we are at a relatively primitive early stage in cosmology, where we find the constituents that are necessary
If God exists, the deity must be smiling. For behind the high fives and hoopla over the Higgs boson, there's a growing doubt that we are anywhere near to understanding the nature of reality. These doubts arise from two major sources.
The award of the Nobel Prize in physics generally creates a mental blur for most people, since no one can comprehend the current state of physics without training in advanced mathematics. This year was somewhat different, thanks to a nickname.
Deadline.com reports that "Theory of Everything," the first feature film to center on the British physicist's life, is coming
The scientific world is suffering through a rash of examples of the sad consequences of the "hype now, hide later" approach to scientific news.
Many insist that man's predatory practices are undiminished and ineradicable. But an opposing trend is becoming visible. While admitting that "the arc of the moral universe is long," Martin Luther King Jr. believed that "it bends toward justice."
What people really want in relationships is dignity, not domination. While it's not hard to understand why people who have suffered oppression might fantasize taking a turn at domination, to actually do so is to over-reach.
By pinning a name on the rank-based abuse that causes indignity, this model of morality addresses one of my take-away questions from Sunday School: How could we make the golden rule not only self-evident, but self-enforcing?
We cannot expect to know God's mind until, at the very least, we have eliminated inconsistencies in our observations and contradictions in our partial visions.
It's the essence of models that they're works in progress. The idea that models can change, and should be expected to yield their place of privilege to better ones, has been surprisingly hard to impart.
"Why are we here?" is a universal question, and to answer it, you must ask "Why are we conscious? Where did mind come from?" After all, if the observer plays such a key role in turning waves into particles, you can't get very far if you don't know what the observer is actually doing.