theory of relativity

Whereas general relativity took a single genius (Einstein) a decade to create, that deeper theory -- known as a quantum theory of gravity -- has flummoxed generations of geniuses for a century.
We all are familiar with the force of gravity. But, where do the gravitational waves fit in the picture?
Many will opine on the right way to recall and celebrate Dr. King's place in the universe. My modest contribution is to suggest we recall and celebrate the universe in which Dr. King, and all the rest of us, have found a place -- and the means by which we know it.
As an artist with years of mathematical training, I am continuously looking for inspiration and find much in Cézanne's and Einstein's work.
Time is the scarcest resource that we have, but it's something everyone has access to it -- whether you're Bill Gates or a person living on the street. This basic equality of time is the foundation for the online time banking platform TimeRepublik.
This month marks the 100th anniversary of Albert Einstein's theory of general relativity. Amid all the celebrations and conferences, it is easy to forget about the real human being who actually did it. But if you live in Princeton, and his piano is in your living room, he is always present.
The Big Rip, the Big Crunch, the Big Freeze, it pretty much sounds like a list of 'big' Hollywood B-movies. Funny as they may sound, these are some of the most fundamental theories for the beginning and the ending of the Universe.
Almost 100 years ago, on November 25, 1915, Albert Einstein presented to the Prussian Academy of Sciences the final version of his general theory of relativity, which also became the standard theory of gravity.
Much of the marketing that is done is based on conjecture with little application of knowledge or bona fide data. Marketers, who never really learned marketing deeply enough, base their judgments on their opinions, which are too often shaped by misconceptions.
A century has passed since Albert Einstein published his seminal paper on general relativity, and scientists are still using
"Big Eyes" Tim Burton's "Big Eyes" has a 75-percent Fresh rating on Rotten Tomatoes and earned three nominations for Best
Have you seen Christopher Nolan's Interstellar yet? It's generating a lot of discussion both about the story and the science, and as one of the characters explains in the movie, the science focuses around Einstein's theory of relativity. As the author of a new book about that theory, I thought I should weigh in on the movie.
Albert Einstein was a reluctant celebrity, but he recognized that he could use his fame to promote causes to make the world more humane and democratic. Today -- when both science and democracy are under attack by right-wing forces -- Einstein's voice as both a scientist and citizen are sorely missed.
While Einstein himself barely dwelt on honors, it is an interesting exercise to ask how many Nobel-caliber breakthroughs Einstein made during his productive research career. This analysis has a bit in common with fantasy sports.
One integral technology we continue to misinterpret is art and often the artists who bring its messages of understanding
In October the most sensitive experiment looking for proof of the leading candidate for dark matter—theorized particles called
Still, says study coauthor Dentcho Genov of Louisana Tech University in Ruston, the team’s microchip model “may hold the