third way

Across the Democratic coalition as a whole, the last seven years have witnessed the increasing presence in the progressive policy debate of two linked but competing lists of policy preferences.
In a new report, "How the Sanders Social Security is Not Progressive," Third Way is warning the electorate that Sanders is coddling the rich. Sanders, who daily attacks the "billionaire class," is proposing to benefit the rich at the expense of the rest of us? Sound preposterous? That is because it is. Let's examine the facts.
If you find yourself singing O Holy Night this Christmas Eve - long lay the world in sin and error pinning, till he returns and the soul felt its worth - consider that the Christ in your Christmas carol felt the sting of social stigma himself.
Third Way, rooted in Romans 14-15, is a corollary to Mere Christianity. If the center of faith is really as powerful as we
Democrats are split.One camp believes everything is okay, at least in presidential years, because the demographic trends favor us and because the Republicans are so damn good at alienating people. Another camp thinks we need to panic because the numbers of Democratic elected officials are so low and Hillary has weaknesses as a candidate.
Nearly twenty-five years after they rose to power, the ideas of the "New Democrats" don't seem so new. Hence, the phenomenon that HuffPost's Sam Stein describes as "the panic of Democratic centrists."
The truth is that, intriguing as Scotland always is, it was in Iraq -- and in the reaction to Iraq -- where Labour got off the winning course.
Frank Underwood is known for deceiving people into acting against their own best interests. (We'll miss you, President Walker.) Now we learn that this trait may extend to the series which features him.
The 2014 election was just as disastrous as 2010. Many observers now agree that Democrats again lost big because they failed to offer a clear economic message to economically insecure voters -- and they once again failed to attack Republicans for sabotaging action to create jobs.
The past few months and years, the church has become increasingly polarized on the LGBT debate. We have neglected to see the importance of what Jesus prayed. Our churches have become dysfunctional and our witness has diminished.
The Boston Globe about Wall Street's secretly purchased influence in Washington, D.C. was somewhat mistitled as being about the "struggle for the Democratic Party's Soul." It's also about how Wall Street's virtually unlimited cash secretly influences the key debates as well as the policy outcomes in the nation's capital.
In 1935 Franklin Roosevelt told a Democratic Party convention that his New Deal social, labor and public works programs had enraged the "economic oligarchs" of the United States.
People who are gay come to churches as indivisible beings. Like the seamless garment of Jesus, they cannot be split into parts that can be included and other parts that can be excluded.
Perhaps it is our job, we insider sheep, to take our eyes off the controversy and place them on the shepherd, who may be not so much seeking our opinion on the matter as executing his own.
Many Democratic women believe Clinton deserves the 2016 nomination because she was a graceful loser in 2008 and a good soldier thereafter. Nonetheless, having Clinton and Warren debate Democratic principles would be good for the party. However, the most serious problem with a Clinton-Warren battle is not gender or ideology. It's money. Many Democrats believe that having Clinton as their presidential candidate would ensure that Dems would receive millions in Wall Street donations, and enough campaign funds in general, to triumph over any likely Republican candidate.
After Warren sent a fundraising email on behalf of Sen. Mark Pryor (D-Ark.), the campaign of Rep. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.), his
No matter what our perspective on the morality of same-sex relationships may be, it is time to discern where all the energy fueling this controversy is coming from and whom it serves.
If American teachers are anywhere near as unimpressive as ambitious Millennials perceive them to be, then the state of public