thomas hart benton

I recognized the bathing suit immediately. It was the one that I tried on sometime in the 1950s, in a cramped changing booth at the dry goods store on Park Avenue in Long Beach, NY, my hometown.
Massachusetts voters, like voters in all "safe states," should have votes of equal weight as those voters who are fortunate enough to reside in "showdown states." The present Presidential voting system is riddled with inequities. Sadly, "I'm from Massachusetts: My Vote Doesn't Count."
Note to self: do not lean on famous murals. Especially if you're the vice chairwoman of the Missouri Republican party.
Before he became known as America's most famous artist in the 1930s, Thomas Hart Benton was painting backdrops for filmmakers in Fort Lee, New Jersey, known now as the first Hollywood. That's right: Between 1913 and 1917 Benton was watching and assisting film directors as they told their stories on a huge scale. And he took copious notes.
Douglas Hyland is the Director of the New Britain Museum of American Art, Connecticut. For the past 15 years he has expanded not only the Collection of America's first museum solely dedicated to American art, but he has expanded the museum itself several times.
I looked at a lot of art while hunkering down to escape the subarctic temperatures blasting through Boston and much of the country last week. My monthly review of more than 400 gallery shows yielded close to one hundred must-see painting shows, three dozen of which involve New American Paintings' alumni.
Biographers often find it amusing to note the job an artist had before becoming able to live off the sales of their artwork, but for artists those jobs are not just anecdotes.
Fed up with the New York art world, which he saw as "morbidly narrow, highly critical of innovation and under the domination