thomas piketty capital in the 21st century

A good example of this practice is tech icon IBM. CEO Sam Palmisano left in 2011, having received more than $87 million in
Why do we seem to be the only developed country that is unable to sustain a healthy middle class, with all the benefits to economic growth that is passed on to every segment of society?
This may seem facetious some six years into recovery, but many policy makers don't understand the severity of the Great Recession, or its consequences. It is the major reason why Greece, and many other Eurozone countries are in so much economic trouble at present.
One CEO has taken a step that could help fend off Thomas Piketty's nightmare vision of rising wealth inequality: He's giving thousands of his workers a raise.
The European: But where can we draw the line? Fighting inequality on a national level often has repercussions that cross
In 2014, serious voices from Pope Francis to Thomas Piketty, in his book Capital in the 21st Century, have lamented ever-widening inequality. Others have expressed concern that "the second machine age" of digital technologies will entail the massive elimination of jobs.
In fact, the FT editor who criticized the French economist's blockbuster, 700-page tome on inequality is sticking by his
“The problem with all the publicity is you have people who write about the book who apparently have not opened it,” Piketty
Piketty's concerns are relevant to the growing inequality in China that has resulted from adopting the neo-liberal capitalist model from the West. Hence, Piketty's reflection on mainstream Western economics indirectly treads a delicate ground in China. It fits right into the current raging debate over which path China's reformers should take in the next stage of "structural reform."
This is reminiscent of the "debate" over climate change: While partisans might still haggle over its importance and/or existence