thomas piketty‎ financial times

In fact, the FT editor who criticized the French economist's blockbuster, 700-page tome on inequality is sticking by his
“The problem with all the publicity is you have people who write about the book who apparently have not opened it,” Piketty
Can the right continue to succeed as the party of unreality? In the recent past, conservatives have denied climate change, as well as evolution. Now, their strategy is to deny the reality of increasing concentration of income and wealth. When Thomas Piketty's book appeared, providing new documentation on increasing capital concentration, the right was temporarily thrown off guard. Some resorted to the claim that inequality was, by definition, earned, and necessary to produce incentives in a capitalist system. But somehow, our market economy did just fine -- better in fact -- back in the 1950s and 1960s with far lower levels of inequality. And much of Europe matches our growth rates with far less inequality. Others simply denied that inequality has been increasing.
Conservatives in all corners of the globe must have felt their hearts sing, if only for a moment, when the Financial Times ran a piece entitled "Piketty findings undercut by errors." Sadly for them, the FT's claims proved untrue.
Piketty put all of his data online in the form of Excel sheets, which are difficult for a novice to follow. The FT never
I turn now to the US case. Here, too, we have probate statistics from 1910-1920 on, and these have been heavily exploited
A recent analysis alleging that Thomas Piketty's groundbreaking data on inequality contains errors is "just ridiculous," according to the French economist.
In an email to Bloomberg News, Piketty dismissed a report published Friday in the Financial Times alleging that his book