tim hetherington

© Guy Martin/nineteensixtyeight And I would like to add "a hero." The wildcard question, what I usually end an interview
In the summer of 2011, just a few months after photojournalist Tim Hetherington was killed in Libya, Sebastian Junger hired me to help him start a nonprofit medical training program for independent journalists working in war zones.
At the annual gathering of the Overseas Press Club Foundation on Friday where 15 top, young journalists were awarded a series of internships and fellowships in international reporting, OPC Foundation President Bill Holstein said Junger was chosen as the keynote speaker because he was "the perfect choice for these troubled times."
So many war correspondents are similar to the many men and women in uniform, who work hard, do their jobs, and even perform acts of heroism, that you'll never hear about, and who never go around bragging, seeking recognition. Then, we have Bill O'Reilly.
Sebastian Junger has managed to find intriguing angles on the deployment and on the longest military commitment in U.S. history in Korengal, which opened on Friday. The new film offers some sober reflection to the visceral jolt that came with Restrepo.
Some freelancers are loudly discouraged by editors from heading to a conflict zone, but egged on at the same time with a
Dr. Karin Karlekar and Danny O'Brien join Ahmed to discuss the sources of oppression when it comes to international press.
You don't want to miss Which Way To The Front Line From Here: The Life and Time of Tim Hetherington. Devastating as it is, it's reassuring to know there are such impassioned, intelligent, brave gatekeepers willing to shine their light on all of the dark corners of the world.
If no story is worth a life, then why is murder the number one cause of journalists' deaths worldwide? In addition to those who have been killed, dozens have been attacked, kidnapped, or forced into exile in connection with their coverage of crime and corruption.
Approaching the two-year anniversary of Tim's tragic death in Misrata covering the risings of the Arab Spring, Sebastian Junger, his close friend and co-director of their Oscar-nominated Restrepo has created an extraordinary documentary of his friend's life.
This week, a powerfully written biography by Alan Huffman has come out on Tim Hetherington's life and death, titled Here I Am in reference to a moment that Hetherington finds himself in his own viewfinder, reflected back in a mirror.
In memorializing Hetherington's legacy, Junger has also brought attention to the incredible risks endured by reporters and
Sebastian Junger, author of 'War' and director of the documentary Restrepo joined HuffPost Live Tuesday to discuss his Reporters
4.) Lest We Forget, Masters Of Soviet Dissent At Charles Krause/Reporting Fine Art Though difficult circumstances doesn't
4.) "The 39 Steps" at Artisphere Part of their celebration of Alfred Hitchcock's early works, this screening of "The 39 Steps
Even though Hetherington found himself globetrotting for global conflicts, he always looked at the story from the point of
Unlike some civil wars -- where neither the government nor rebels want journalists around to bear witness -- Junger said