title vii

The businessman says allowing one of his employees to express her gender identity "would be violating God’s commands."
For Donald Trump or anyone else to single out the negative, destructive, and, yes, evil passages of the Quran (or how some sects or cults within Islam co-opt, distort, and attempt to hijack the overall messages) without doing so as well with the holy books of Judaism and Christianity demonstrates a hierarchical double standard.
Will the Supreme Court make it harder for workers who are forced to quit because of a discriminatory work environment?
The 12 weeks provided by the Family and Medical Leave Act is clearly too short. A 2005 study found that American babies whose mothers were back at work within 12 weeks were less likely to get doctors' visits and immunizations on time, and less likely to be breastfed
Ms. Leyth Jamal was subjected to a hostile work environment at the Saks department store in the Houston Galleria when she was employed there in 2012. The harassment was typical and brutal: routine misgendering, forcing her to use the men's room, and a general environment grounded in ridicule from her co-workers.
Today I'd like to discuss one of the first two post-Macy cases being brought by the EEOC, a case that highlights the conflict surrounding the transgender condition brilliantly. It shows us the state of mind of those Americans who either are profoundly ignorant of science or detest those who don't fit into their limited conceptions of sexuality.
This is an opportunity to educate the general population that discrimination on the basis of gender identity and expression, which encompasses tens of millions of people, is illegal and harmful to the bottom line. This is an opportunity to humanize and overcome ignorance and fear so that there is no desire to deny employment in the first place.
I would like to return to the post that generated the most debate and heat, "Burying the Lede: The LGBT Community's Deafening Silence on Federal Transgender Employment Protections," which provided in-depth background about the most momentous federal trans-rights advance in our history, and the community silence that followed. It struck a chord.
Religious organizations receiving federal contracts can no longer discriminate against lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender employees. Some question whether President Obama has gone too far. Others question whether he has gone far enough.
Since much homophobia and transphobia is rooted in misogyny, it's clear to me that in order to cleanse our faith-based institution of anti-LGBT bigotry, we're going to have to do a much better job of dealing with the pervasive sexism. That will require a very long-term effort.
Comparing Hobby Lobby with the two rulings in civil rights law cases issued by the Court over the last year, the key factor that explains how the conservative majority ruled is not precedent, the language of the statute, or congressional intent, but who wins and who loses.
Diversity is no mere slogan, but a challenging reality. Respect that is not reciprocated is subservience. As I would not have your beliefs imposed on me, so I must not impose mine on you. This is part of the social contract.
If my gay colleagues choose to jettison ENDA, I'm willing to back off. But the question with which I am left is: Now what? Do we really expect that the House of Representatives, which won't even debate the version of ENDA with broad religious exemptions, will seriously consider a stricter amended one?
The company with a vast racially diverse staff claims they reduced its workforce using a combination of skills, behaviors
I am heartened by the new focus on gender expression and its significance for gay as well as trans persons, and hopeful that such a focus will force our state and national advocacy organizations to evolve in a manner that will benefit all of us, and in particular the least among us.
Transgender Americans are protected against discrimination in employment in all 50 states under federal law. There, I said it. Our gay and trans organizations have been, at best, burying the lede, and at worst, remaining silent and even misrepresenting the current legal state of affairs.
First, the Senate committee overseeing ENDA passed the bill to the floor of the Senate without amendment. Then Mia Macy won a judgment from the DOJ in Macy v. Holder, and a settlement was reached in another trans discrimination case, this time at a private employer in Maryland.
Trans people are often married when they transition, so these rulings add comfort to knowing that the complicated politics of gendered identity will have less impact on their relationships, particularly when they dissolve or inheritance issues arise.