Tom Stoppard

You must be in love with your life partner, but you also must be in like.
Time for a toast: from left, Dan Clegg, Safiya Fredericks, Narea Kang, Stacy Ross, Brenda Meaney, Vandhit Bhatt Spike: "Uh
When I first watched Sherng-Lee Huang's and Livia Ungur's fantastical film Hotel Dallas, I was reminded of that Salvator Dalí and Walt Disney collaboration Destino.
The scenes that take place in India are the most poignant, so lush that one could almost feel the heat of the day and smell the fragrant jasmine.
Writers dream of a better place and what they can do to right the wrongs that artists feel so deeply. These readings could have taken place in a San Francisco cellar with Lenny Bruce and George Carlin waiting in the wings.
In Something Rotten!, as in the famed line from Hamlet, "there's something rotten in the state of Denmark," two Bottom brothers, one a talented poet named Nigel (John Cariani) and the other Nick (Brian d'Arcy James), compete with Shakespeare (Christian Borle), the rock star of the Renaissance.
Mostly well done, Tom Stoppard's The Real Thing, directed by Sean Gray for the Long Beach Playhouse Mainstage Theatre, recounts the story of Henry (Noah Wagner), a brilliant and celebrated playwright.
When people with widely disparate cultural beliefs meet up in real life, several outcomes are possible. One of the best examples of this phenomenon was depicted in Pacific Overtures (the 1976 Broadway musical which focused on the historical moment in which Japan opened its isolated island society to Western culture).
"Rasa" is the Indian term that describes the essence of an artwork. It only occurs through a participant's uplifted experience of the art and it is flowing in full force in American Conservatory Theater's new production of Tom Stoppard's Indian Ink.
The "hard problem" as you probably know is actually a phrase referring to the problem of accounting for consciousness. Most things are not conscious. This table we are sitting at isn't conscious. Vegetables aren't conscious. We are conscious, and nobody understands how we do that; physically, scientifically or metaphysically. Nobody really knows; and that's the "hard problem."