Tom Stoppard

You must be in love with your life partner, but you also must be in like.
Hilary's introduction to the institute involves conversation with another job applicant, name Amal (Vandit Bhatt), a mathematician
When I first watched Sherng-Lee Huang's and Livia Ungur's fantastical film Hotel Dallas, I was reminded of that Salvator Dalí and Walt Disney collaboration Destino.
The scenes that take place in India are the most poignant, so lush that one could almost feel the heat of the day and smell the fragrant jasmine.
Writers dream of a better place and what they can do to right the wrongs that artists feel so deeply. These readings could have taken place in a San Francisco cellar with Lenny Bruce and George Carlin waiting in the wings.
In Something Rotten!, as in the famed line from Hamlet, "there's something rotten in the state of Denmark," two Bottom brothers, one a talented poet named Nigel (John Cariani) and the other Nick (Brian d'Arcy James), compete with Shakespeare (Christian Borle), the rock star of the Renaissance.
Mostly well done, Tom Stoppard's The Real Thing, directed by Sean Gray for the Long Beach Playhouse Mainstage Theatre, recounts the story of Henry (Noah Wagner), a brilliant and celebrated playwright.
When people with widely disparate cultural beliefs meet up in real life, several outcomes are possible. One of the best examples of this phenomenon was depicted in Pacific Overtures (the 1976 Broadway musical which focused on the historical moment in which Japan opened its isolated island society to Western culture).
"Rasa" is the Indian term that describes the essence of an artwork. It only occurs through a participant's uplifted experience of the art and it is flowing in full force in American Conservatory Theater's new production of Tom Stoppard's Indian Ink.
The "hard problem" as you probably know is actually a phrase referring to the problem of accounting for consciousness. Most things are not conscious. This table we are sitting at isn't conscious. Vegetables aren't conscious. We are conscious, and nobody understands how we do that; physically, scientifically or metaphysically. Nobody really knows; and that's the "hard problem."
No one should be surprised when any theatrical canvas painted by Tom Stoppard is enormous: In Indian Ink, he outdid himself, perhaps too ambitiously.
A bigger concern, however, is the rather tepid chemistry between the lovers. If there is a current of unbridled passion between
We have a lot of fun watching these couples flirt, banter and reconcile, yet there's an absence of true emotion that left me feeling lighter than I should have in a play about jealousy, knowledge and the preservation of one's self in a marriage.
The playwright, who spent part of his childhood in India, has fashioned Indian Ink as a chamber piece, an intimate story of love, memory and cross-cultural miscues. It's as much a chiding of presumptuous biographers, as it is a study in the sensitivity and caprices of love and time.
The final pieces of the puzzle that surrounds Flora's time in India and her relationship with Das begin to fall in place
Mid-period Stoppard -- that is, the work of the acclaimed Czech-born British playwright in his fifties and early sixties -- brought forth a remarkable series of intricate, thought-provoking-but-inviting plays like Hapgood, Arcadia, The Invention of Love and The Coast of Utopia.
Now that Shakespeare in Love has officially opened in the West End and been hailed by the critics as " ... a grand adaptation" and " ... a swooning delight," Lee Hall is ready to talk about how tough it actually was to translate the Academy-Award winning screenplay to the stage.
Tthe hardships of living under the claustrophobic and brutal Belarusian regime of death squads, disappeared persons and jailings has gone under the radar. Hopefully, this documentary will boost concern and ignite interest and support for those who are suffering.
Politicians, warriors and self-important fools frequently fail to learn anything from the past. But for creative types, the past offers a wondrous portal which invites them to explore science and history (as well as the history of comparative religion, costume design, distant cultures and lots more).