too big to jail

If the bank's deflection of blame onto more than 5,000 low-level employees is any indication, customers waiting for Wells
With DOJ's continued failure to bring criminal charges against any executives involved in the financial crisis, many are questioning whether it is just business as usual in Washington and the C-suite.
"There are two legal systems: One for the rich and powerful, and one for everyone else."
While there have been critics of those developments on both sides of the aisle, some good proposals for legislation, concerns raised by judges, and saber-rattling statements from the Department of Justice, what we have not seen is a plan for action that fundamentally rethinks how financial offenses are handled. The Clinton plan would do, among its recommendations, four key things to tackle too big to jail.
But she stops well short of Bernie Sanders' call to break up the banks.
Obama administration proposal would aid big banks that have pleaded guilty to felony antitrust charges.
So much for that tough talk about holding Wall Street accountable for its crimes.
Collateral consequences is an idea that Attorney General Eric Holder laid out near the end of a famous memo that everyone
In her confirmation hearing this week to become the next U.S. attorney general, Loretta Lynch said that "no individual is too big to jail" and "no one is above the law." But, at least in one recent case in which Lynch was a key player, this may not be accurate.
On Jan. 28, 2015, the Senate Judiciary Committee opens two days of hearings to consider President Obama's nomination of Loretta Lynch to be Attorney General of the United States. Here are some questions that senators should ask to make sure that size no longer shields a company from the rule of law.
Despite a deep, close and extremely lucrative relationship that lasted decades, JP Morgan Chase wasn't even required to publicly disclose the information that detailed its complicity in Madoff's scheme, including how much money it made and how.
"You don't think you should be doing any investigations?" replied an incredulous Warren. "You should wait to see if it jumps
With the nomination of Lorretta Lynch for attorney general, it is a crucial time to learn from past mistakes and oversights. We call on Lynch to learn from the past and work towards true accountability and fairness for all.
Germany's respected Handelsblatt, that country's parallel to the Wall Street Journal, recently devoted an entire section and a featured interview to the deliberate and ongoing crushing of American Michael Winston's finances and spirit by one of our country's largest banks.