top 1 percent

In his inaugural address, Donald Trump correctly reported a crime -- the ongoing rip-off of America's working families -- but misidentified the culprits. That's not surprising, since he's one of them and plans to accelerate the theft now that he's in power.
The Federal Reserve's core guiding belief is that economic stimulus boosts economic growth, thus increasing employment opportunities, payrolls, tax revenues, corporate profits, retirement security and Wall Street wealth.
Some hedge funds and lawyers are going to be paying Uncle Sam a little bit more.
The poorest fifth of Americans would get just under 3 percent of the tax breaks.
For all the frantic, often chaotic political engagement swirling about us these days involving taxes, gun rights, religious liberty and foreign policy, Americans may well be overlooking an even bigger problem: Have we unconsciously consigned the American Dream to the proverbial dustbin?
Several evaluations of black and white wealth in America have surfaced over the past several months. Yet, these tools only tell part of the economic story. To truly understand the difference in economic access, you must look at the top of American wealth, and be honest about what you find.
The growing need for engaged, productive stakeholders is not filled magically. It requires a specific, intentional brand of leading - Relational Leadership.
In 1965, for every dollar earned by the average worker, CEOs earned 20 dollars. By 2012, that gap mushroomed to 354 to one. But, when asked in the survey, Americans grossly underestimated this gap.
The rich have gotten richer at the expense of the rest of us. "Stagnant growth at the middle is just the flip side of fast
T. Boone Pickens, the 85-year-old oil tycoon, was giddy to welcome Dr. Dre into the ridiculously rich people's club Friday