town hall meetings

Merriam-Webster Dictionary describes a town hall as “an event at which a public official or political candidate addresses
Reactions like your son's usually occur with what's called a "hot load," meaning there was another substance mixed with the
At my new workplace things are different. We use videoconferencing for pretty much every meeting. It's on our desktops, in
"Camera? What camera? Dad, what are you doing?" my eldest asked, peering down the stairs and seeing the tripod-mounted iPad
Recently, presidential candidate John Kasich answered a freshman student's question about how she could "feel safer and more secure regarding sexual violence, harassment, and rape." According to CNN, Kasich said, "I'd also give you one bit of advice. Don't go to parties where there's a lot of alcohol. OK? Don't do that." The audience then applauded.
On Friday afternoon, Marco Rubio's town hall event in Henniker, New Hampshire was my first chance to see him in person.
Can you imagine your partner and yourself holding a weekly formal meeting? The idea might intrigue you, but what if it turns into a gripe sessions or a series of demands?
My message to Los Angeles clergy and 'leaders' in their condemnation of 'Black Lives Matter,' is that they are on the wrong side of history and are virtually proclaiming their own irrelevance to the cause of social justice. It is all of our duty to struggle for righteousness and against injustice.
On this July 4th, let's declare our independence from bad meetings. It's time to demand that we all be heard when we gather, not just on election day, but everyday.
Groups across the political spectrum have used rallies, marches, and picket lines to bring their agendas to the attention of the media, government and fellow citizens. But public attitudes about this form of political engagement have historically been mixed at best.