trachoma

Trachoma, easily treatable, blinds thousands of the world's poorest every year.
She would pay neighbors to pull them out, but they always grew back -- straight into her eye.
Despite ‘unprecedented progress’ further gains depend on water and sanitation, says the World Health Organization 87-year
This piece was co authored by Virginia Sarah with Geordie Woods, Technical Adviser Neglected Tropical Diseases, Sightsavers
Back then it was different. Subsistence farmers in Ethiopia owned only the clothes they worked in and did not wish to be
One of the lesser known success stories in global health is about the progress we have made over the past decade in controlling and eliminating neglected tropical diseases or NTDs. And yes, the term "neglected" is there for a reason: because these diseases affect the poorest of the poor and have endured largely due to indifference and neglect.
If you're blind in the world's poorest countries you are likely -- on top of a life already made difficult by poverty, hunger and unemployment -- to face stigma and discrimination stemming from the belief that blindness is a curse.
I have never been one to shy away from a challenge. Whether taking the train into New York City by myself as a young teen to attend dance classes with Alvin Ailey, or deciding at the age of 40 to abandon a career in the arts to get involved in the HIV/AIDS crisis, or, just ten years ago, taking the helm of one of the oldest NGOs in the U.S.
Achieving the elimination of blinding trachoma in 2015 in Mali and Niger will reinforce the promise of global elimination for 2020 and can save the sight of thousands of children and adults. It can also serve as one of the greatest tributes to Helen Keller's legacy the world has ever seen.
Neglected diseases like trachoma may not be as well known as HIV/AIDS or malaria, but they also are not as far removed from the developed world as we think.
We're at risk of failing the poorest nations if we don't step up our efforts to address a health concern that's connected to the success of nearly every important socio-economic development milestone. I'm talking about neglected tropical diseases.
It's not easy to introduce neglected tropical diseases, or NTDs, to first time audiences. The truth is they may be the most important diseases of girls and women you have never heard of.
In London today, global health leaders announced an unprecedented commitment to control or eliminate 10 diseases by the end of this decade.
Last year, a horrible disease impaired and robbed 8 million people of their vision. Right now, 84 million people are infected with this disease. But there can also be cause for hope.