trans military service

The vice president declared transgender rights to be "the civil rights issue of our time."
While the notion that transgenderism is mainly if not entirely a medical condition may have helped remove a little bit (though certainly not much) of the stigma attached to being a trans person, it also limits us. And it will limit the military.
I can't remember the day I learned that transgender people were still banned from serving in the United States military. But I do know I met that fact with shock. How shortsighted of me to not consider them in our work. Why had I not known this before?
Last week Professor Dean Spade, a former teaching fellow at Harvard and transgender activist, attacked efforts to raise awareness of the exclusion of transgender people from U.S. military service.
The network these brave LGBT troops were building, using a new generation of social tools like Facebook, was strong, but it had one glaring weakness: Its security was completely dependent upon the policies and the precautions put in place by the companies that hosted it.
Many in the trans community had a hard time coming to terms with the idea that adding other requirements to the repeal of DADT, such as open trans service, was not really the same fight. As Allyson also was transgender, I had presumed that she would have the same opinion.
As the combat exclusion for women comes to an end and open service for gay, lesbian and bisexual Americans edges closer to truly equal service, it becomes more and more obvious that there is no rational basis on which to bar qualified transgender people from serving in our armed forces.