trans visibility

Amelia Gapin is the first trans woman to appear on the popular magazine’s cover.
Raskin became Renee in 1975 and eventually decided to play professionally as a woman, which she did with a good deal of success between 1977 and 1981 (by which time she was 47). Richards faced a storm of controversy, befuddlement and derision for who she was.
One of the main problems is that many of us don't live around trans people. Growing up, I never had trans people visiting my house. My family doesn't even know any trans people. This invisibility, propagated by the willing and unwitting actions of governments, media and authority figures, perpetuates the isolation of the trans community from mainstream culture.
According to the organizers, "Geni" is a project that calls into question the representation of transgender bodies, while
As a suicide-prevention organization, The Trevor Project knows how important it is for young people to feel accepted for who they are and know that someone out there cares about their future. That's why we're standing alongside national organizations, colleges, and communities nationwide to help raise the visibility of trans* people and the unique issues they face.
#WhatTransLooksLike hi guys I am Anna, im 43 and really happy of who I am becoming day by day :-) pic.twitter.com/SESXo3bPru
Today, March 31, marks the annual celebration and recognition of the International Transgender Day Of Visibility. As issues
I told the students I have been with my partner Janis for 13 years, and that we have three young children. I never mentioned my transition or used the words "lesbian" or "transgender." I just let them draw their own conclusions. Then I asked if I might do an audience participation exercise.
Visibility is what the trans* community needs. It's a factor that is so paramount in our struggle for acceptance and our rights. Despite the rich history of PrideFest in Tower Grove Park, it's time that the trans* community take back to the streets and venues as we did in the past.
Recently I asked a number of transgender and cisgender friends the following: If a transgender person does something that may reflect badly on the trans community, is their personal freedom of expression more important than expectations to conform?