Transformers: Dark of the Moon

Let's be real here: the best part of any and all "Transformers" movies had nothing to do with Shia LaBeouf or Megan Fox or
3D seeks to fulfill an enduring dream of humanity: to gain mastery over the world by recreating it through art and technology.
"Transformers 4" (presumably a working title) would be among several action films shooting in the city later this year, according
It is greatly worthwhile to celebrate the notable movies of 2011 that took the risk of advocating for democratic freedom, the political principle that makes so much film artistry possible.
This weekend is an excellent example of why it's the numbers, not the rankings that matter when discussing box office. And, more importantly, the context of the numbers must be taken into account as well as the hard figures.
Los Angeles, CA. (July 19, 2011) - Voltage Pictures and Wildwood Enterprises have cast Shia LaBeouf and Robert Redford in
I continue to be nostalgic for comedy that doesn't require constant profanity or a surfeit of fart gags to succeed, that relies instead on subtle, clever scripts and witty dialogue; movies that in the end give their audiences some credit for brains and taste.
The Autobots and Decepticons ruled the box office yet again, as the Middle East-occupation parable grossed another $47 million over the weekend.
Big. Bigger. Biggest. Somehow those words don't seem fitting descriptions for the new Transformers: Dark of the Moon. Biggeriest? Spectactimammogigantular?
There are those who will scream "DISAPPOINTMENT!" because Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen opened with $200 million in its first five days two years ago. If $180 million in six days is disappointment, sign me up for failure anytime.