Treatment Advocacy Center

Those judged to be criminally insane often receive better mental health treatment than practically anybody else — including people who have never committed a crime.
The topic of mental illness and violence is complicated enough in its own right, but also gets badly distorted by the misleading propaganda generated by the shameless National Rifle Association.
The Treatment Advocacy Center has been the lonely voice of the voiceless and the staunch defender of the defenseless. Its reports document our shame and should inspire the practical steps needed to end the neglect.
America must turn the page on its over-dependence on the criminal justice system. In order to break arrest cycles and end inappropriate criminalization of people with mental illness we must support community based behavioral health care.
The certified dogs and their trainers include Mullins and her dog Sampson; Pat Duper and Lizzie, a Dachshund; Elizabeth McGlaune
Whether one believes that there is stigma to being mentally ill; or discrimination against the mentally ill, the answer remains the same: let's help the most seriously ill.
Fortunately families of those affected have stepped up to fill the gap by establishing three organizations dedicated to finding
According to Amenoma Hartocollis of the New York Times, New York City tightened their rules for monitoring discharged patients
A recent study issued by the National Sheriff's Association and the Treatment Advocacy Center describes the shocking fact that there are now three times more mentally ill persons in American jails and prisons than there are in hospitals.
It is well known to parents of people with schizophrenia and bipolar, that when their loved ones are off medications, they can deteriorate to the point where they don't even know they're sick.