truthiness

By now we've all heard about it. Facebook has a fake news problem, a rampant epidemic of phony and outrageous headlines in which a fraction-of-a-penny-per-click gets traded for lies.
"The Late Show" host took on the Republican Convention and won bigly.
As we move into week one of a year when international news won't be "all bad, but much of it is," according to NBC News Chief Foreign Correspondent Richard Engel's 2016 forecast, let's see what's in store closer to home.
Newsweek's editors have done a disservice to their readers with the publication of Randy Simmons' broadside attack on wind power. Simmons argues, in short, that government subsidy of wind power (such as the production tax credit, or PTC) is counterproductive and too costly.
NBC's escalating crisis surrounding respected news anchor Brian Williams' fabrication of details about his reporting from Iraq in 2003. The deal Twitter just struck with Google to make tweets more searchable online. These two events should open a new referendum on the relationship between truth and trust in the information we digest daily.
On May 13, the ECJ rained on Google's anti-privacy parade by ruling that people can ask Google to delete sensitive information from its Internet search results. On the surface, you would think that online privacy advocates would refer to this court decision as the shot heard round the world -- only it's not and here's why.
Despite all the debate you often hear about global warming, the basic scientific case is so simple that it can be reduced to a three-step deductive argument.
Just over a week ago, Philadelphia Weekly published a cover story about a local musician named Jordan White, premised on the notion that White -- an earnest singer-songwriter type -- was some sort of stealth superstar in the Philadelphia music scene. The headline in the print edition was insistent in pushing this zingy notion: 'Jordan White may be the most famous local rock balladeer you've never heard of.'
The metrics and values by which we construct business success comprise what we believe to be a false narrative of the world, which means serious risks to the world's most vulnerable communities.
Must all religious catechesis be dull? Manning does not suggest that catechists or anyone but Colbert can replicate his "delighted/delighting" approach, but they can learn from him as a model.
IMPORTANT: Before I start down this road, let me make one thing perfectly clear. I am not going to tell you which party I
Pursuing day-in day-out accountability reporting is more challenging than ever in a world of diminished journalistic resources and increasing spin. But battling misinformation is a special and essential kind of watchdog journalism.
Obama has finally learned from Colbert that neologisms are not just snappy ways of packaging important ideas; they are also ways to get your supporters to play an active role in spreading them.
To trope on Bill Clinton, "It's Arithmetic." Colbert and Stewart have shown us that the Romney campaign adds up to lies and insults. Now it's our turn to do the math and decide what this campaign really adds up to.
Mayor Castro's family lore rings true. His grandmother, with a family tree extending back to Coahuila and Zacatecas, came here as a young girl and was taken in by relatives.
CBS News reported that most of the major claims made by Ryan about Obama's record were misleading and untrue. Ryan then kept up his pattern of truthiness after the RNC when he lied about his best time in a marathon, shaving off more than an hour from his finish time. Seriously?
See a slideshow of the work on view below: "More Real? Art in the Age of Truthiness" is a multiple media exhibition of contemporary
Truthiness is the quality of knowing something in your gut or your heart, as opposed to in your head. Colbert didn't just diagnose a deep malady in American political discourse. He also used phrases that anticipated research results on the differences between liberals and conservatives.