tunisia protests

The country may have gained political freedoms, but its economy remains a mess.
The protests began Sunday, after a man who had lost out on a job climbed a transmission tower and was electrocuted.
"The Tunisian people will not bow," President Beji Caid Essebsi said in a speech after the march. "We will stay united against
He wrote a poem. Recited it in his apartment to a group of seven people. Unknown to him, the poem was recorded and uploaded on YouTube. That was in 2011. Now he sits in prison in Qatar, serving a prison sentence of 15 years!
By Tarek Amara But rioting broke out in one southern city, with police firing teargas to disperse hundreds of youths who
The incidents reflect mounting anger and frustration among North African youth who have few if any social and economic prospects.
Eventually, Assad or his sons must renounce power; history teaches that no repressive regime lasts forever. But how long until this family falls? How long until "might makes right" is replaced by morality, until the pen and law and human decency really do triumph over the sword?
Both countries are now weakened by violence. Another path is possible. Taking it requires the willingness of politicians, especially those who are governing, to open the dialogue and create a broad consensus. This is the only choice; the other leads to the abyss.
Post-revolt Arab nations are experiencing tumultuous times. Underlying the volatility in Egypt and Tunisia as well as difficult transitions in Libya and Yemen is the increasing lack of confidence between Islamists and non-Islamist forces.
We must go beyond the facile media explanations about intolerant Muslims and start to explore the complex political, economic, historical, and cultural circumstances that have contributed to these particular protests that are taking place in these particular geographies.
"Obama, Obama, we are all Osamas," they chanted, in reference to the slain al Qaeda leader, Osama bin Laden. The protesters
In the global age, it is no longer just dictators or overzealous elected head of states with power of preemptive strikes can direct history to the edge of an abyss, but also fruit vendors and lousy filmmakers.
The informal sector -- those businesses and entrepreneurs who work outside of the formal market economy -- is huge and largely undocumented in most developing economies.
What is more important to an incipient democracy: the freedom to practice your religion, or the freedom to criticize it? More
To make good on its promise, this generation will have to continue to stand up and participate -- not just in the moment of protest, but in the building of sustainable institutions for years to come.
This week, the American Spring began. It was a celebration of what's best in America -- civic community and self-expression. But last night I also saw the worst of America. I saw police do everything they could to suppress our right to express ourselves and gather freely.
Watching the 2012 campaign unfold from a distance, it is clear to me that the American political system has become ridiculous at a time when we really need it to work.
It is unacceptable for the world to stand idly by, watching what is happening to Arab women in the age of change, and welcoming the prevailing democracy that takes away women's fundamental and democratic rights.
Whether to rally troops before battle in the American Revolution, to give voice to the people, as in Chile, music has often