tunisia revolution

It speaks to the openness of Tunisia that there exists a gay club, yet it is tucked inside a bourgeois enclave of exclusion.
Few would dispute the significant advances Tunisians have made towards democratization since escaping Ben Ali's dictatorship in 2011. But these accomplishments have remained elitist matters, viewed with apathy by the wider population.
The country may have gained political freedoms, but its economy remains a mess.
"It was no longer the Tunisia that we were all familiar with."
TUNIS, Tunisia -- Exactly five years after the Arab Spring, Tunisia's revolutionary achievements have disappeared. Once considered the country that resisted the chaos that took over most of the MENA region after 2011, it seems to be sliding back into its pre-revolutionary situation. There is only one cause for this: poor leadership.
"STRONG RESPONSE" TUNIS, March 29 (Reuters) - World leaders joined tens of thousands of Tunisians on Sunday to march in solidarity
A video published by the Interior Ministry on Facebook showed the cell had owned instructions for making explosives and a
Blogging on the unfolding events in Yemen had its price. When she received a threatening message on her Facebook account, her reaction was simple: she translated it from Arabic to English and posted it on her blog!
On Sunday, protests broke out in the southern city of Hamma after Essebsi's victory became clear. Young people came out to
Tunisia, which had shown Arabs a way out of the prison of dictatorship through peaceful protest, is today demonstrating that on the ruins of the old order a democracy could be built.
The incidents reflect mounting anger and frustration among North African youth who have few if any social and economic prospects.
What are the obstacles to democratic transition in the Arab world? It is a critical question, as the lives and well-being of millions of people are at stake.
On the third anniversary of the Arab Spring, the principal question is: has the Tunisian model for democratic transition succeeded in placing Tunisia on the path of democracy? And what are the principal features of this model that make it successful?
While those in Western countries may wonder what is meant by "transitional justice," in societies emerging from a period of mass abuse -- such as systematic torture, massive disappearances and crimes against humanity -- the question of how to address past abuses is an urgent one, particularly for victims.
A wall in Sidi Bouzid is covered with revolutionary graffiti depicting Mohamed Bouazizi, a young street vendor who lit himself
Both countries are now weakened by violence. Another path is possible. Taking it requires the willingness of politicians, especially those who are governing, to open the dialogue and create a broad consensus. This is the only choice; the other leads to the abyss.
For better or worse, Tunisia might be following the example of Egypt and starting its own rebellion. Unless social violence and government incompetence become so banal that Tunisians fail to react to the second political assassination of its democratic transition.
Tunisia's own transition has been rockier than its quick disappearance from our media radar screen might lead us to think, and Tunisians' experience of Islamist politics has changed the lens through which many here now view Syria.