Turing test

Ask a computer that can detect a million shades of red which one is the nicest. It has nothing to say. "Nice" is outside its logic.
Before IBM's Deep Blue made it cool, there was a chess-playing computer. In the late 18th century and into the 19th, it wowed incredulous audiences who couldn't tell, though many suspected, that a human was somehow behind it.
Facebook has recently launched a limited beta of its ground-breaking AI assistant called M. M's capabilities far exceed those of any competing AI. Facebook employee David Marcus explained that M is, in fact, human-aided. However, M itself wouldn't admit it, so I tried to expose that human element.
This leading neuroengineer thinks it's dangerous to even try.
Enter now the era of intelligent machines. Siri may not convince anyone yet to be really intelligent; but "she" and other AIs are evolving fast, and become better at using and understanding natural language.
The race has begun, every decade brought a ground breaking technological innovation, this decade is starting to unravel a mystery that men like Alan M. Turing spoke about in the 20th century, where machines will be more intelligent than humans, improving by themselves over time.
To measure the intelligence of intelligent machines has been an obsession of computer scientists since the dawn of the computer era. The pioneering genius of Alan Turing has bequeathed us a test based on perception.
Machine-made consciousness remains one of the great challenges of modern science. "Ex Machina" makes us think about what that might mean.
What makes a mind come alive? And how will you know when it's happened? Two new films -- one about the death of the factory school, the other about the dawn of artificial intelligence -- attempt to answer this question from radically different vantage points.
When I went to Eugene's website to test out his chops, Eugene asked me where I was from, and I replied "New York." He then -- implying that I was being self-involved -- asked if I wanted to know where he was from.
I'm no particular fan of the Turing Test, and certainly not of its current grandstanding instantiations in the Loebner Prize and others of its ilk.
Some researchers said a computer chat program called Eugene Goostman may have been the first to pass the Turing Test after convincing a few human judges it was a 13 year old Ukranian boy... but other experts are skeptical.
So, over this past weekend, a computer running a program that styles itself "Eugene Goostman" is said to have successfully passed the Turing Test. Did that really happen? And, if so, what does it even mean?
Alan Turing would have been proud. Or would he have been terrified?
For the first time ever, a computer has successfully convinced people into thinking it’s an actual human in the iconic “Turing Test.”
For the first time ever, a computer reportedly has passed the math genius's iconic Turing Test, The Guardian reported. The
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