turkey kurds

The Senate majority leader joined other Republicans who are speaking out against the president's decision to withdraw U.S. troops from Syria.
Both before and during the aerial bombardment of Taleban strongholds, I conducted phone interviews in Dari with fixed line
Since the flags were spotted in Kurd-controlled territory last week, Turks and Kurds have squabbled about their origins.
All the signs are, Turkey's bleeding, unresolved Kurdish issue this time comes to a boiling point.
Turkey is hoping to drive out Islamic State militants and check the advance of U.S.-backed Syrian Kurdish fighters.
Kurdish militants are suspected of having carried out the attack.
The true story behind this coup is eerily similar to the events in Turkey in the middle of July coup.
I have known Erol Önderoğlu for ages. This gentle soul has been monitoring the ever-volatile state of Turkish journalism for ages, more regularly than anybody else. His memory, as the national representative of the Reporters Without Borders (RSF) has been a prime source of reference for what we ought to know about the state of media freedom and independence.
Foreign countries interested in condemning Armenian genocide should not only draw distinctions between Turkey and the actions of the Ottoman Empire. They should make the same distinction between Erdogan and the people of Turkey, who do not always support him.
Turkey's march towards authoritarianism took another dangerous turn this past week with the forced resignation of moderate Islamist Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu, apparently at the insistence of President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan.
The conflict between the two groups is at its deadliest in two decades.
As Turkey slouches toward dictatorship, purging enemies and former allies, Recep Tayip Erdogan has a cheering section, in the form of the AKP, the ruling party in Turkey.
The battle is over immunity for lawmakers, which some claim is being used as a tool for suppression.
Turkish soccer pitches tell the story of the country's multiple sharpening fault lines that are exploding into political violence on the streets of Turkey's major cities as the government fuels deep-seated political and ethnic tensions.
Living in Turkey today means going out into the street and not fearing death more than you would on any given day. Living in Turkey means trying not to live with the realization that you are living in a war zone under the pretense that it's a civilized place.