turkish elections

A funereal atmosphere descended over western capitals with the announcement of Turkey's parliamentary elections' results, widely described in European and American media as a "shock" and a "black day for Turkey." The picture painted appeared very bleak, as a stream of reports, editorials and op-eds by opposition figures warned of a "return to autocracy and despotism" and declared the outcome as a threat to the "survival of democracy" in the country.
For Erdogan, coalition government and power-sharing remains anathema. It is a concept he does not understand, grasp or accept. According to Erdogan's world view, politics remains a zero-sum game of winner-takes-all.
The scandals, the palaces in the Bosporus, the prosecution of his opponents, Taksim Square and the violent confrontation with the young protesters, the hundreds of journalists in jail.. In the eyes of some of those who believed in him the liberator now seemed a dictator.
The outcome of Sunday's parliamentary election will be important for Turkey's domestic stability, its role in resolving the Syrian conflict and Europe's migration crisis, and Erdogan's legacy.
The new cabinet includes pro-Kurdish and nationalist legislators.
VIENNA -- The success of the mainly Kurdish Peoples' Democratic Party in capturing 13 percent of the vote in the recent election -- a total well above the party's core constituency -- should boost the Kurds' confidence and ease the way ahead in the peace process. But the far-right Nationalist Movement Party performed strongly in the election, capturing 16 percent of the vote, probably owing largely to popular opposition to the opening to the Kurds.
ISTANBUL -- Having lost its majority in parliament, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan's party will no longer be able to form a single-party government. In practical terms, this means the end of Erdoğan's dreams of changing the Constitution to create a presidential system. From now on, Erdoğan is no longer the only one in charge in Turkey.
Supporters of pro-Kurdish Peoples' Democratic Party (HDP) wave a Kurdish flag while celebrating in the streets the first
Sulu says he has hope. “Being able to be in the politics openly and able to speak up freely is a huge development,” he explained
We live a world with an ever-increasing global peer review. Material or moral superiority of the West is no longer a foregone conclusion. The quicker the West sheds the illusion of the default superiority, the faster all of us can start the essential work of making liberal values relevant and compelling in a post-western world. In other words, Turkey has an Erdoğan problem, but all of us have a larger liberalism problem. This conundrum is relevant beyond Turkey. Rwanda's Paul Kagame, Hungary's Viktor Orbán and India's Narendra Modi may be manifestations of a similar phenomenon. Throughout the second half of the 20th century, the liberal West told the rest of the world: "Be like us to become rich" while the 21st century is producing many illiberal ways to enrich societies.