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The costs included hotel rooms and car service for a Secret Service detail, according to CBS.
By James M. Dorsey With attention in the Middle East focussed on the Gulf crisis, the United Arab Emirates is elsewhere seeking
Donald Trump hates muslims. So why were some muslim majority countries left of his travel ban? Surprise surprise - it’s all about the money.
Donald Trump hates muslims. So why were some muslim majority countries left of his travel ban? Surprise surprise - it’s all about the money.
“If anyone is to be banned from entering the United States because they present a threat, it should be individuals like the
"Whatever Trump voters thought they were getting by supporting him, I'm reasonably sure sending tens of thousands of Americans
It's time for the new administration to act. Seven decades ago, airplane range was limited, fuel stops were needed, and airlines
The company's dizzying growth trajectory is bumping into slowing demand in many of the regions that have been the foundation
A: Yes, but also for a different reason no less important: Much the way that in the United States the path toward politics
In fact, the previous two points highlight the fact that women filmmakers have always been a strongpoint of the Arab film
Jackson also commented on the two directors he's worked with most often. With Lee, he called the filmmaker "very fortunate
Something else that is different in this festival, even more in this edition I feel, is the strong presence of female filmmakers
The UAE, having invested in a lobbying campaign in Washington to bring the U.S. on board with Abu Dhabi's global campaign against the Muslim Brotherhood, may have reason to look forward to working with a US president who labels the Brotherhood a "radical" organization.
In October, Sheikh Hamdan Bin Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum, the Crown Prince of Dubai, announced on Twitter Dubai's goal to become the first government in the world to execute all of its transaction onto a blockchain by 2020.
Earlier this month, two of the three massively subsidized, state-owned Gulf airlines announced additional flights to and from the United States.
This article first appeared as an E-Note of the Foreign Policy Research Institute. Some perspective on these responses emerges
Citizens in several of the Arab Gulf states appear to have a higher appreciation for the quality of life available to them in their countries than do citizens in most European countries.
Beyond adding further tension to an important alliance, the U.S. Senate's passage of a bill that would allow private citizens to expose Saudi Arabia to 9/11 legal claims will impact how international law is practiced, with serious ramifications for the United States.