Uighurs

A bipartisan group of lawmakers has urged the Trump administration to hold Beijing "accountable" for their alleged persecution of Uighurs.
An official government report laid out its aims to assimilate Muslim ethnic minorities and root out extremism.
The U.S. finally wants to pressure China to close the camps. Its allies have other ideas.
Regular citizens, reporters and rights groups adapted to get the truth out about China's treatment of Uighur Muslims.
Congress should approve future military action only when Washington has no alternative course to protect America--its territory, people, or constitutional liberties.
Xi is likely to conclude from his visit that dabbling in the Middle East is easier said than done. Engagement in a region
China and Turkey had high hopes when Prime Minister Wen Jiabao on a 2010 visit to Ankara negotiated a strategic partnership that envisioned Turkey helping China quell a simmering insurgency in its north-western autonomous region of Xinjiang.
Turkish soccer player Alpaslan Ozturk's decision to risk fame and wealth by expressing support for the embattled Turkic Uighur minority in Xinjiang reflects pressures in China's ties to Turkey, its most complex relationship in the Muslim world and a key node on the Silk Road that Beijing hopes to revive.
A scan of white papers on multiple foreign policy issues published by the Chinese government is glaring for one thing: the absence of a formulated, conceptual approach towards the Middle East and North Africa (MENA).
Last year's mass anti-government protests against Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif and led by politician Imran Khan generated much speculation about Pakistan's next military coup - but of course it didn't happen.
Being a big believer in the lessons taught by history, I'm inclined to think that the current 'love fest' between China and Russia will probably have a limited shelf life.
Despite being officially atheist, and historically most closely associated with Buddhism, China has a deep-rooted relationship
One good thing for the president is that his Asia-Pacific Pivot -- heightened engagement with the rising region, and nascent superpower China -- hasn't been wrecked by the lengthening array of Obama administration distractions, including his troubled and tardy war against Isis.
Recent separatist attacks include an October 2013 incident in Beijing's Tiananmen Square, in which three Uighurs drove a
Beating ISIS on the battleground could prove inconclusive, even counterproductive, if its dogma is not de-legitimized. This cannot be done by the gun but the law and a political system that offers an alternative to the rule of might.
The Uighurs are indeed Muslim, but the Uighur issue is not about terrorism, jihadism or establishing a caliphate -- as China wants the world to believe. It is about a colonized people's legitimate demands to live with dignity, human rights and self-determination in the 21st century.
Chinese state media quickly affixed blame for the attack on ethnic Uighur separatists from the restive northwestern province
From China to Burma to Egypt, some governments invoke the "T" word to justify official conduct that runs afoul of international human rights law.
Police announced Wednesday the arrests of five people in connection with this week's suicide car crash in the heart of China's capital, calling it a planned terror attack — Beijing's first in recent history — and identifying the attackers as members of a Muslim minority.