UN climate change

After promising to slow the rise of the oceans in 2008, president Barack Obama has finally cemented his climate legacy.
The Paris climate accord, signed by 175 countries in April, was a high point of success for the United Nations. The U.N. has also managed to focus governments around the world on sustainable development goals. Yet, on the security side of the equation, for which the U.N. was principally founded, the record is largely one of failure. (continued)
All in all the cornerstones for accountability and compliance are present. The Agreement is committed to robust and common
Paris today is at the center of a global crossroads where two narratives converge. One is a narrative of violence and terror that seeks to divide the world and incite a global conflict. The other is a narrative of hope that seeks to bring the world together to confront a global security threat that military and government leaders say looms larger than terrorism: the impact of climate change.
The United Nations Climate Change Conference, also known as COP21, begins later this month in Paris. There, as Newsweek put it, "leaders and high-level officials from 196 parties have 12 days to reach an accord that could save the planet." That's not an exaggeration. The stakes are huge and we're not going to have many opportunities, with everyone gathered together, to come up with a solution equal to the problem. And the business world is going to have to be a part of that solution. So I'm delighted that Michael Bloomberg, whose commitment to working toward solutions to this crisis is inspiring, has asked me to share my own thoughts on the subject as part of "Businesses for Climate," a series on how businesses are addressing climate change leading up to the conference.
People aren't going to be dragged reluctantly into tomorrow's low-carbon economy, looking back mournfully over their shoulder at the familiar world they're leaving behind. It has to be a world that is so enticing, so technologically cutting-edge and so affordable that they will demand the benefits of a sustainable world.
We are on the cusp of a promising new economic era, with far-reaching benefits for humankind. What's required now is a global commitment to facilitate the transition to a digitalized green economy if we are to avert catastrophic climate change and create a more prosperous and sustainable society.
BEIJING -- The climate change negotiations have reached the most critical time. After Xi's visit to the U.S., there's a little over 10 weeks until the UN climate conference in Paris.
There is no higher priority in relations between the U.S. and China than to begin serious cyber detente negotiations to establish a code of conduct.