UNAIDS

Expanding access to earlier treatment through TasP not only save lives, it also saves money. In the US, about one in eight
Grizelda Grootboom recently published "Exit," a book about her violence-ridden and homeless childhood, sex trafficking, her escape from prostitution and her transformation into one of the most vocal survivor leaders in South Africa committed to ending the sex trade.
The "power of prevention" needs to be realized, UNAIDS has urged.
It is time to raise the scales of preventive and punitive measures for sexual abuse by UN peacekeepers. An unequivocal message needs to be sent to every member state and troop contributing countries that only personnel who see the protection of human rights as their mission will continue to serve as UN peacekeepers.
Prostitution, one of the most brutal forms of male-perpetrated sexual abuse, is illegal in South Africa. While corrupt police are known to arrest and brutalize the women for loitering, buyers of sexual acts are rarely arrested.
In the course of a day, nearly all LGBTQIA people in this country must be aware that their identity and even their sole existence may endanger their personal safety.
Our culture's current lack of understanding of women as full human beings must evolve into a conviction that indivisible rights include freedom from unfettered male sexual access, from female genital mutilation to child marriage; from reproductive health to sexual violence; from sexual harassment to prostitution. Achieving equality depends on it.
The world is failing to protect the health and human rights of people who use drugs. As a result, people who use drugs, especially people who inject drugs, have been isolated and denied the means to protect themselves from HIV, hepatitis C, tuberculosis and other infectious diseases.
The world has gotten this far because of massive investments in the HIV response. To actually end the epidemic, though, it is imperative that we resist complacency, cutbacks in funding and a sense that, on any level, our work is done.
Marginalization combined with internecine conflicts, pockets of extremism, poor human development and cross border terrorism have trapped so many of Mandera's people in poverty and misery.
By 2030, AIDS could be a thing of the past, a new UNAIDS report has concluded Since 2000, the number of new HIV cases has
In 2015, the International AIDS Society (IAS) will hold a conference in Vancouver, returning to the city for a large-scale meeting the first time since the 1996 AIDS Conference that heralded the beginning of the era of highly active antiretroviral treatment.
The Board of UNAIDS, the coordinating body for global HIV policy and programming, gathered in Geneva in December to rally support for a remarkable goal: The end of AIDS as a global health threat by 2030.
We just can't wait five years to see if the AIDS response is on track. We need ambitious, yet feasible, short-term targets and strategies to be just as well-defined, and just as rigorous, as the longer-term goals that UNAIDS has worked to advance.
"I'm not going to sit here and pretend to know everything right now, I don't," she said in her speech, Reuters reported. "I'm
I was born in the early '90s, therefore I have little knowledge of what happened in the '80s about the massive spread of HIV/AIDS and the causes, preconceptions, concerns about the soaring death rates and news coverage about the disease.