universal health coverage

Benchmarking, exchanging, and scaling up these types of best practices are essential to achieve universal health coverage
We urge the G7 nations to show leadership and to make political and financial commitments to Universal Health Coverage at their upcoming summit in Japan. This would be a clear signal from the most powerful economies that "business as usual" will not do if the world is serious about implementing the SDGs.
This past September, as I joined fellow leaders and global citizens at the UN, I was confronted by a brave fellow Kenyan. He challenged his leaders to make HIV treatment available to all who need it and to address the stigma too many people living with the disease face every day of their lives.
Universal Health Coverage (UHC) is a target of the Global Goal for Health. All people should have access to good quality, comprehensive health services without being exposed to financial hardship.
It is through greater collaboration across sectors that real progress will be made toward achieving UHC. There is too much to do and too much at stake for the global health community to continue to spin its wheels about why it needs to engage the private sector and other non-State actors.
Governments all over the world insure their buildings or assets from potential risk. Yet, why do so many governments refuse to similarly insure their citizens from the risks posed by a lack of preparedness in a country's health infrastructure and in the delivery of essential health services?
Just as a patient with a weak immune system is more susceptible to disease, the Ebola crisis reminds us that a nation with a weak health system is more susceptible to epidemics.
Poverty should no longer mean poor health, nor should ill health lead to poverty. That is the promise of UHC. It is widely recognized that good health reduces poverty, improves educational performance, increases productivity, and as a result, stimulates economic growth.
Lessons from Latin America remind us that transparency, accountability and social participation are key elements of an effective and equitable extension of health coverage. Social participation has been a key component of advances toward UHC in the region.
While the dance of legislation can be painful to watch, I still like the Democrats' chances for healthcare reform better than Tom DeLay's on Dancing with the Stars.
Providing universal health coverage is essential, but there are many, many other social policy avenues to pursue if we seek to improve the health of our citizenry.