universal pre-k

This is the second in a series of five blogs that we will post on grit and what it means for poor kids.
The tax has been suggested as a way to pay for universal preschool in Philadelphia.
Governments could be receiving an extra $167 billion annually if corporations paid Reagan-era tax rates.
Poor students enter kindergarten already lagging behind their more affluent peers.
Infographic by Alissa Scheller for The Huffington Post. Labor unions and women’s groups love the idea. The business community
This week, we mark two years since President Obama laid the framework to provide universal high-quality preschool for every single child in America during his State of the Union Address.
Going into his second year this remains the greatest challenge for the mayor -- to make sure that New Yorkers know he is more focused on running the city as he is on fulfilling his progressive agenda. It's not an either-or scenario, he can do both.
It has come to our attention that your older brothers and sisters have been showing up to Kindergarten completely unprepared for the requirements of a rigorous education. It is time to nip this indolent behavior in the bud.
The mere existence of universal pre-k in New York is a giant step in the right direction. Amidst the hue and cry over dismal state test scores for third and eighth graders, we now have a new grade being established which can only be positive. But along with great opportunity comes great responsibility.
While the focus has been on the negotiations with the unions representing New York City employees, missing from the picture are the thousands of union members whose salaries are entirely paid for with City funds, but who are not on the City payroll.
Moskowitz is trying to paint herself as a defender of black and Latino children, but really her war on Mayor Bill de Blasio is not about children or civil rights. It's about Moskowitz wanting more power, more profit for her 22 schools and demanding to get everything she wants.
If we are to remain the Greatest City in the World -- great for New Yorkers rich and poor alike -- we must develop a next generation prepared to take the reins. One tool to help alleviate poverty and nurture our young people is universal pre-k.
Disagreements persist about the details of funding, but a real consensus has begun to develop that all young children deserve what has until now been unaffordable by low-income families. But here's the catch.
On the weekend before his January 8 State of the State speech, Governor Andrew Cuomo had a phone chat with Mayor Bill de
Asians and Hispanics will be 50 percent of new voters for 21 GOP districts in 2014. They will be 40-49 percent of new voters for 10 districts and 30-39 percent of new voters for 32 other districts. That's 63 Republican controlled districts in which many new voters will care about where their Congressperson stands on issues of immigration reform.
We know the American workforce is changing at a rapid pace as families rely more and more on women's income to get by. But, as the face of the American workplace has changed, the federal rules that govern it have not kept up.
Last year while visiting Le Havre, I talked with a young waiter working two jobs to save enough money to go to school to specialize in international law. I asked him how much money he needed, and when he told me 4,000 euros, I almost laughed.