Urban agriculture

But people can't live on microgreens and exotic salads alone.
As this news circulated through the urban agriculture community, gardeners and their allies organized a City Hall protest
There are 2 groups that have been quietly planting and growing food in urban gardens and making a huge difference in their respective areas, KAM Isaiah Israel's Social Justice Committee in Hyde Park and The Talking Farm in Evanston/Skokie.
"Perhaps there could be a way to compost for credits toward fresh produce. Really, New Yorkers need to buy what they can consume and stop producing so much waste in the first place."
Anyone who has passively nurtured a pile (i.e. just let it sit there) knows that it can take months, if not years, for a mini mountain of food scraps and landscaping waste to become luscious black gold.
I was in the sixth grade at Henry Nash Elementary School on the West side of Chicago, and my class had gotten the opportunity to get away from daily life and dive into nature for two weeks.
I started volunteering with Earth Matter several years ago because I was drawn to the chickens, rabbits and goats. Aggressive squirrels, threatening rats and dive-bombing pigeons made up most of my wildlife interactions in NYC, and I longed to be around creatures more friendly and fun.
Ecological Farming Association - @Eco_Farm EcoFarm supports ecologically sustainable food through education, advocacy, and
As a proud born-and-bred Parisian, as an enthusiastic traveller, as someone who's been living abroad, I must confess that each time I go back home I'm shocked by some archaic features of the City of Lights.
NEW YORK -- Ironically, in this era of exponential growth, we are witnessing the disappearance of cities. Our urbanism is becoming increasingly generic -- a Starbucks on every corner and an iPhone in every palm. We can do better.
To grow aromatics, strawberries, or radishes you only need a window and a window box. If you have a balcony, a yard, or, even better, a terrace or a piece of land, you can grow any of the 16,000 marketed varieties of these plants.
3. Herbs Herbs can be grown anywhere and take up very little space. Consumer demand for herb gardens is so high that there
"Nothing in nature is straight. So that's how I design. There's no rhyme or reason. I'm planting for aesthetics. I want to be assaulted by smell, by beauty, by taste."
By growing food locally and giving underserved urban neighborhoods access to fresh produce, jobs are created, local economies are strengthened by circulating dollars within the community, the harmful effects of food deserts are reduced, and consumers become engaged in learning how food is grown.
When a man of means such as Mark Spitznagel intentionally goes rogue in Detroit, it is not about survival. It is about ego, audacity, entitlement and a blatant disregard for the rule of law.
At the local level, many communities are quickly recognizing the overwhelming desire of the general public to regain control of their food sources out of the desire to live healthy and sustainable lives.
Urban agriculture projects -- from community gardens to beekeeping and rooftop farms -- are gaining popularity throughout
For some farmers and gardeners, particularly those in low-income neighborhoods, urban agriculture is a means to a more ambitious end: an attack on racial, gender and class disparities and political disempowerment.
The people of New York City require some 4 million acres of food-producing land -- roughly the size of the entire state of
The growing process is ultra-efficient, too: a one-acre greenhouse is capable of growing up to 500,000 pounds of pesticide