urban renewal

It's taken almost 60 years, but we are finally realizing the error we made when the United States built highways through the middle of its cities, displacing and isolating hundreds of thousands of residents, and we're beginning to do something about it.
A Harvard professor took his class to St. Louis and D.C. to help try to figure out how.
Just a few miles from the gleaming but largely uninhabited white towers of modern Panama City's skyline, it's a small area of crumbling but glorious architecture some of which dates back to the 17th century.
When it comes to the African American community, the people running San Francisco have been very insensitive and shown no sense of urgency about correcting the social, educational, and economic ills of African Americans.
In response to this dark side of gentrification, some Latino community leaders in Los Angeles launched the "gente-fication" movement ("gente" is Spanish for "people," but you already knew that).
NEW YORK -- The decisions we make for our streets today will lay the foundation for the future: we can build those cities that are truly worth bragging about, or we can build places you drive though on your way to someplace else.
I absorbed the dynamics of difference, because, I, too, was different. If rights were denied to others, my rights would be denied, someday, too. That's why we should care about Ferguson. Fearing our neighbor means losing our religion.
The police are just one actor in a larger stage driven by our racial climate. Their roles are more visible and are attended to, accordingly. We must do a better job building bridges between law enforcement and people of color and roads to stronger communities.
But what if there's also a cost to living in our own bubble? What if this disconnection also sows the seeds for violence and prejudice in our cities and communities? If you don't know the people around you, is it easier to misunderstand, hurt and be hurt, fight and fear one another?
The lessons from the past, including resistance that led to rethinking the top-down approach and discrimination embedded in the postwar federal urban renewal program, suggest that efforts to reshape American cities' landscapes will not succeed without community buy-in.