us africa relations

[15] Geoffrey Aronson, “China to open its first naval base in Africa,” Aljazeera, December 22, 2015. [6] Nick Turse, "The
As General David Rodriguez prepares to retire, he has a reason for avoiding attention. His tenure has not only been marked by an increasing number of terror attacks on the continent, but questions have arisen about his recent testimony before the Senate Armed Services Committee.
Since 9/11, Africa has increasingly been viewed by the Pentagon as a place of problems to be remedied by military means. And year after year, as terror groups have multiplied, proxies have foundered, and allies have disappointed, the U.S. has doubled down again and again.
The U.S. is "taking China as a rival in Africa," one paper said.
For years, as U.S. military personnel moved into Africa in ever-increasing numbers, AFRICOM has effectively downplayed, disguised, or covered-up almost every aspect of its operations, from the locations of its troop deployments to those of its expanding string of outposts.
Conventional wisdom usually does not link trade to programs and policies that address poverty. We need to unpack this conventional wisdom and explore how improving key aspects of trade link to development, using as an example how U.S.-Africa trade policies can unlock Africa's economic potential in agriculture.
Today's global landscape is much, much different than it was 5 years ago, or even earlier this year with the surge of the Islamic State, wrath of Nigeria's Boko Haram, Crimea's annexation, and continuing Syrian and Libyan conflicts.
While the media touted the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit as a sign of Africa's "rising" and its soon-to-be key role on the world stage, the truth is quite the opposite. African leaders' love for summitry isn't a sign of a rising continent, but rather, a sign of confusion, weakness and lack of direction.
LGBT individuals away from medical care and treatment, school, jobs and even housing. As a result, LGBT Africans are overrepresented among the under-educated, under-employed and homeless. What can the U.S. do to help advance rights for LGBT Africans?
As the U.S. Fortune 500 and U.S. private equity are set to turn its corporate gaze toward Africa, it has the chance to learn from previous investment attempts and promote this new model of interaction on the African continent.