usa freedom act

The announcement comes after a three-year effort to strike down a gag order on the case.
We are enslaved to systems that don't have our best interests at heart, in order to fulfill a basic human need: communication. We need to seriously consider creating alternatives to the internet, which would allow our communities to have ownership over how we talk and share information.
So despite the fact that some of the Republican debaters were up in arms about it, the USA Freedom Act actually has produced only very marginal gains for privacy. The current state of affairs is mostly depressing, especially in light of the floodlight on these issues gifted to us by Snowden.
Well it finally happened. Donald Trump, not content with merely mocking reporters, calling for the deportation of Muslim-Americans, and erecting walls along the American border, has a new target in his crosshairs: the Internet.
In an age of too many laws, too many prisons, too many government spies, and too many corporations eager to make a fast buck at the expense of the American taxpayer, there is no safe place and no watertight alibi.
As countries like the United Kingdom, Brazil, and China develop their data policies, the U.S. can offer a model that respects rule of law and individual rights. We can do it. This can happen.
The court previously found the program illegal in May, ruling that the Patriot Act did not authorize the National Security Agency to install such sweeping surveillance.
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Asked how current American policy fares in balancing national security and individual privacy, nearly 38 percent said security
So that happened. On this week's podcast, we get excited about some sporting updates, get the lowdown on the newly passed
Some foes of mass surveillance have been celebrating the final passage of the USA Freedom Act, but Thomas Drake sounds decidedly glum. The new law, he tells me, is "a new spy program." It restarts some of the worst aspects of the Patriot Act.
What remains to be seen is whether, when all is said and done, the powers-that-be succeed in distracting us from the fact that the government's unauthorized and unwarranted surveillance powers go far beyond anything thus far debated by Congress or the courts.
Now that fear appears to be ebbing, senators on both sides of the political aisle were willing to openly oppose aspects of the Patriot Act. Time has provided the elixir needed to the help the nation realize the balance between security and individual liberty is crucial.
The NSA’s spying program is officially back on with some minor changes.
Obama strongly supports the Freedom Act, and the White House has said the proposed amendments seem unnecessary. Senate rules
When several key provisions of the broad, post-9/11 surveillance law known as the Patriot Act were up for renewal five years ago, the Senate debated for just 20 seconds before reauthorizing the sweeping powers by a voice vote.
Rand Paul is leading on an issue that is near and dear to his political philosophy. You may not agree with where he's leading, and you may not think this is going to help him politically, but you've got to at least admit that he is showing leadership. And that, to me, is admirable.
Sanders told Couric he plans to vote against the USA Freedom Act, which orders the government to transition to a system in