uspirg

To put that in context, a family in that bracket makes less than $34,000 per year - meaning that even after their expected
U.S. PIRG says it will face a choice between paying staffers more or working them less. Which is the whole idea.
At the end of the day, don't buy the hype. Traditionally published eTextbooks often aren't all they're cracked up to be. If we want a world where learning materials are actually effective, ac-cessible, and affordable, we need to invest in open textbooks.
Now, in the sphere of higher education, we often talk about the potential for OER to save students billions of dollars in textbook costs, but what's happened at Williamsfield since the switch reveals that the value of OER over traditional learning materials extends far beyond the difference in price.
It's a pretty common thread that textbook prices are too high. At a time when student debt is higher than ever, it's crazy that we're charging students so much for textbooks.
This fall, the Administration is developing new ideas for the U.S. Open Government National Action Plan -- an international commitment to transparency and openness -- and making federally funded educational resources open to the public should be on the list.
Here's the catch: the big textbook publishers that are charging $200 a book don't want students to buy used textbooks -- it means less profit for them.
For decades Congress has recognized that investment in higher education is the pathway to economic growth and a sustainable, healthy workforce, but last week Republicans in Congress released a budget proposal that includes about $150 billion in cuts to student financial aid.
We need faculty to make the switch and drop their traditional textbook for an open textbook. It's not hard, but it's not easy, and institutions can make a huge impact by providing training and resources for interested faculty to make the switch.
American transportation money should be spent on fixing the roads we have, as well as investing in non-driving transportation modes that are increasingly attractive to the public, especially the massive millennial generation, which will be the chief user of today's transportation investments.
A sensible approach, especially given the recent decline in driving and increasing demand for transit, would be to plow a greater share of those limited resources into expanding access to public transportation and active transportation modes while focusing highway spending on fixing our existing roads and bridges.
We know students and families across generations are struggling with their debt. High debt can also have serious impact on the economy: causing a generation of Americans to hold off starting a family, buying a house, or even saving for retirement.
Dealing with students loans can be stressful -- even overwhelming. Here are a few tips to minimizing how much you pay and keeping your debt manageable.
In recent years, we've seen a major spike in deals that allow financial service providers to disburse federal financial aid to students through products like debit cards. These deals, which have raised serious concerns from consumer advocates, were shown to have significant risks for students.
It's that time of year again. Students and families are packing up their cars and heading off in pursuit of higher education. Here's some advice from a former college student: Visit the college bookstore before your parents leave.
Change is possible. There's a strong alignment between the interests and desires of most voters and those of small and medium-sized businesses. People overwhelmingly support increasing tax contributions from large corporations.
To prevent student loan debt from getting even worse, student borrowers need loan reform that truly delivers lower costs than if no action is taken by July 1 and the rate doubles.