Uterine Fibroids

This painful women's health condition is shrouded in silence and misconceptions.
A Texas woman recently gave birth to a boy, thanks to a transplanted uterus. Dr. Zaraq Khan, a Mayo Clinic reproductive endocrinologist
Fibroids are common in all women, but research suggests that African American women are significantly more likely to develop uterine fibroids.
Uterine artery embolization Uterine fibroids are noncancerous tumors of the uterus that often appear during childbearing
I share my story of discovery, treatment, and recovery to encourage other women to advocate for their health. If you notice
Given these realities, many are left questioning why fibroid research has lagged in the past and what's being done now to overcome this all-too-common health disparity.
The experiences of women who undergo hysterectomy have not been given adequate attention -- especially in the area of how reproductive organs can provide a sense of identity to women.
I have a four year-old and a one year-old and I can't imagine putting a relaxer in their hair because, like most kids their ages, they are busy-bodies. My mother relaxed my hair when I was four years old and my sister got her first relaxer when she was three. It really boggles my mind now.
A recent study in the Journal of Women's Health revealed that young African-American women, ages 29-39, suffer the most complications from uterine fibroids. I can relate as I -- and so many other women I know -- have experienced health issues and lifestyle disruptions due to fibroid tumors.