Uttar Pradesh

In the name of the cow These new rules have reinforced the impunity of criminal groups that burn down Muslim and Dalit businesses
Video footage from the scene showed members of the disaster management team and locals trying to rescue trapped passengers from windows and debris using phones to provide light.
I had to pinch myself to confirm it was true. Had I really won a month of India travel through a contest called "You Wander We Pay?"
While the stories vary slightly, the bottom line is the same: Women are targets. Why? Caste, class and poverty among women rob them of their rights and deprive them of protection.
Diarrhoeal diseases linked to fecal contamination kill 1,400 children a day. Another 162 million children worldwide are stunted -- they are undersized and may have developmental delays -- with the lack of adequate sanitation, water and hygiene being a contributing factor.
Disillusionment with the ruling Congress is widespread. Its leadership too seems resigned to not regaining power. All it wants to do is thwart Modi from winning.
Here's our policy lesson in a nutshell: Bangladesh is the world's demonstration case for an off-grid clean energy access plan that delivers. Bihar and UP are the next phase that will take this approach to scale. Maybe, just maybe, 1.3 Billion people later, the message, small solar is big, will finally sink in.
Much attention has been paid to the distributed clean energy revolution brewing in Bihar. But for all the hype generated by Minister Kumar, what's happening next door in Uttar Pradesh may be even more exciting.
Majestic Islamic gates announce entry into another world of small lanes and decaying palaces. The Bara Imambara is an architecturally ambitious tomb of a Shiite man that incorporates a mosque and gardens.
A Mother and her daughter's values clash in rural northern India. Is this what happens to teenagers everywhere, or does living in extreme poverty exacerbate these issues?