vawa reauthorization

It seems like every week brings new and horrific stories of sexual harassment and violence on America's college campuses. Study after study shows that sexual harassment and violence are far too prevalent in institutions of higher education.
Prior to VAWA, in many states physical and sexual violence against a woman by someone she knew was not considered as serious a crime as was an attack by a stranger. Thinking about it now, it's hard to believe.
Haven't we fought for several centuries to overcome such disempowering stereotypes about the inherent fragility of women in college?
The American public's cynicism about Washington can diminish when bipartisanship prevails and bills become law. The most recent example of this was the signing into law of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act by President Obama yesterday, July 22.
Why does the U.S. government not respect native american tribal sovereignty yet argue the sovereignty of nation-states, such as Ukraine in the current geopolitical situation, must not be violated?
On the night of her 20th birthday more than seven years ago, my niece Carol Kestenbaum, along with her best friend Nicole Schiffman, were shot and killed outside Carol's apartment.
As a key player in shaping global development priorities -- priorities that include education, health care, food security, economic empowerment and ending violence against women and girls -- the United States has an important role in ending early and forced marriage worldwide.
Sexual assault on Native American women should be regarded as more serious than vandalizing cars in Singapore, and it is about time that Congress recognized it as such.
By branding domestic violence and sexual assault, we aim to engage the general public to understand that, like other health issues -- cancer, heart disease -- domestic violence and sexual assault need to be more of a priority.
But quickly the memory takes a darker turn as Lisa Brunner recounts listening to the screams of her mother as her stepfather