veteran employment

It's probably no surprise that since I left the military six years ago, the beginning of each new year has reminded me of
The results include opening doors for vet loans from approved non-banking organizations without the stringent regulations
Recently at a luncheon that brought together veteran service agencies with companies hiring veterans and supporting veteran and service-disabled veteran businesses, I heard Carole L. Bionda speak about the efficacy of employing veterans.
Amazon will provide 10,000 people with training in cloud computing skills.
With the effort to stay atop the latest innovations in digital marketing, many advertisers are overlooking media channels that still have great efficacy. When we look deeper at print media in the military community, it starts to make sense in the context of an overall campaign.
The report found that we veterans are not the "broken heroes" that our national leaders and the media have made us out to be. To be sure, some veterans do struggle with unemployment, homelessness and Post-Traumatic Stress (PTS), but on the whole we are a resilient bunch.
One participant in the study, Adam Navarro-Lowery, whose PTSD had previously gotten so severe that he was both unemployed
The push is backed by American Corporate Partners, a nonprofit founded in 2008 to help returning veterans build their post
Veteran Sarah Serrano is a model, actress and writer who works with Veterans in Film and Television. (Photo courtesy of Sarah
Although the employment situation for veterans has improved since I left the military, the most recent report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics tells me we still have work to do. Every man and woman who has honorably worn the uniform of this country has the ability to make our nation stronger. I know because they already have.
I realized that if we could match up military skills and training with civilian job requirements we could literally change the lives of 18 million veterans in the U.S. workforce.
The best advice I can give to those who are about to become veterans is to take your transition as seriously as any mission you carried out in the military. Identify your objective, and develop a plan to achieve it. Do your research, understand everything you have to offer a company, and find mentors who can help you through the process. Then execute.
The road to veteran status is long, narrow, bumpy and filled with unexpected twists and turns. It starts for most with an enlistment of three to four years in one of the armed services.
If you want to see what resilience looks like, go find a military spouse. Military spouses are at the heart of the armed forces community, and their efforts extend far beyond their individual households.
Working with veterans before and during the transition when there's time to intervene, would reduce the number of crisis calls that end in tragedy. Don't we owe it to these men and women?
Most of the time, it's likely that the slang you hear has a positive connotation, but not always. It's useful to know whether you're receiving praise or a poke. You might even be able to surprise your veteran co-workers by dropping some military jargon of your own.
The military has its own language, and so does the corporate world. Most vets need guidance in translating military terminology to convey what they have accomplished. Companies working with ex-military should be aware of this language gap.
It comes in the form of discriminating against veterans by age or by the conflict in which they served. And it manifests in the form of veterans charities not assisting all veterans in need or employers not hiring all qualified veterans, regardless of age.
As proud as I am of serving in the Iraq War, I am finding it increasingly difficult to tell civilians stories of war. Stigmas are still placed on combat veterans and the overuse of the phrase "empowering veterans" has painted the veteran landscape as a community in need of help after service.