veteran suicides

She didn't need him to tell her what's going on.
Nugent was speaking at the Republican Party of Maricopa County, Arizona's Lincoln Day Dinner, where he had been introduced
It's been five years since Jacob Sexton, a soldier with the Indiana National Guard, came home with nightmares after two combat deployments, and on a Monday evening in a movie theater with family and friends, killed himself with a pistol shot. He was 21-years-old. The story is horrifying, and sadly familiar. On this day, we pause to honor the 21.9 million living Americans who have served in uniform. We might also remember the estimated 8,000 veterans and 475 active duty, reserve and National Guard men and women who took their own lives last year in the ongoing tragedy of military and veteran suicide. Jacob's death, like the others, could have been prevented.
A VA study from last year found that an average of 22 veterans commit suicide daily. According to a member survey conducted
Not only can we help Veterans take that first step to getting support, we provide an important resource for those already in care at times when the crisis is immediate. It's up to us to persuade callers not to give up, to show them that there's a light at the end of the tunnel.
My business card says Suicide Prevention Coordinator, but I consider myself a life preservationist. I connect people with the right benefits, a mental health counselor -- or I simply listen.
How do we prevent these suicides? With more of our courageous warriors dying by their own hand than on the battlefield, it's obvious that our current approach isn't working.
Better screening for and treatment of mental health disorders can help ensure that those who are facing these issues are getting the treatment they need.
In an exclusive video for The Huffington Post's "Invisible Casualties" series, first lady Michelle Obama joins Dr. Jill Biden
Need help? In the U.S., call 1-800-273-8255 for the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. "When you feel like you can’t take