Victoria Clark

What makes a show fail? Many in the industry have pondered that question. If we knew the answer, shows wouldn't fail. Even veteran producers with a string of hits sometimes stumble. For there is really no magic key.
The reference to the release from Arthur Freed's incomparable MGM unit is recorded here as preamble to the unhappy news that a woefully cheap travesty of the gloriously romantic film has now opened at the Neil Simon.
No, no, no. Of course he's not the Messiah. That contraction would be grammatically incorrect, anyway. Rather, we're speaking of his - meaning "Idle's" in the possessive form - Not The Messiah (He's a Very Naughty Boy) that has played to sold-out audiences around the world since 2007.
This week, making its New York City premiere, Writer/Director Sharon Greytak's gripping Archaeology of a Woman, plunges deeper into the portrait of dementia and its disturbing effects than any other recent film on the subject.
Is it the role? The performance? The writing? Whatever the problem may be, it leaves this Snow Geese foundering.
Those drawn to The Snow Geese for the star at the center of it, Mary-Louise Parker, might be disappointed to discover a vulnerable, careless woman whose demons have been exposed after the untimely death of her husband.
The correct title for the Sondheim-Lapine opus would be Romantic Obsession, and it wouldn't try to ingratiate itself as a depiction of what genuine love is. Passion is anything but a love story.
As you are ushered to your seats you will already be oohing and aahing over the forest stage set.
"Glass slippers are back!" shouts the sign outside the Broadway Theatre. And so is entertainment. It took Rodgers and Hammerstein's Cinderella 56 years to get to the Great White Way, but if the shoe still fits, flaunt it.