Victoria Woodhull

A film on suffragist Victoria Woodhull is needed now more than ever.
Join me and globally renowned thought leaders including Sir Michael Barber (UK), Dr. Michael Block (U.S.), Dr. Leon Botstein
What were the challenges Woodhull faced that were different to ones women face today? Which challenges do you believe are
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Efforts to improve the status of women and girls cannot ignore the power of role models and the influence of knowing American
Nope, Hillary wasn't the first. Before her there was Victoria C. Woodhull. I hear you asking, "Victoria who?" Most people haven't ever heard of this 19th century female suffrage icon, but she was a revolutionary woman before her time. Here are seven things she can teach us about being strong, modern women.
It's really not about "equality"; it's about freedom. Freedom. FREEDOM. The freedom to live a life fully and without fear, no matter your gender. Women today, especially in America, are living a dream that our foremothers dreamed for us. And they have passed the torch to us.
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When Victoria Woodhull was nominated for President of the United States by the Equal Rights Party in 1872, she did not expect to win. Indeed, she did not receive any electoral votes. What this imperfect and brave woman from Ohio did do, however, is refuse to consent.
In England they turned themselves into respectable ladies as best they could. Victoria denied her past, even going as far
Will independent media outlets that contributed so mightily to the stunning election result speak truth to power and expose corruption and injustice over the long haul -- no matter who's in charge?
Her figure, her clothes, her hair, her voice - all of it mocked and savaged in a way unimaginable if she were a man. She never answered their hate with rage. She just went on winning.