volkswagen scandal

The company said it is "fully cooperating with all government agencies.”
Oliver Schmidt, who oversaw the automaker's regulatory compliance office, faces fraud charges.
Have you ever thought about switching to an electric vehicle (EV)? Duped drivers of so-called "clean diesel" Volkswagen cars in particular may be in the market.
The automaker already agreed to pay $15.3 billion over its emissions scandal.
Despite promises of transparency, VW will probably never reveal what transpired that set the company on this self-destructive path. But perhaps we can cull a cautionary ethics tale from this still unfolding scandal.
Governments and business can no longer conceal the death toll, and publics are unwilling to tolerate it. Governments are acting. The VW settlement is not the only regulatory crackdown on internal combustion engines.
In one of the most creative and ambitious environmental enforcement settlements in U.S. history, we are addressing the immediate pollution issue VW caused and, at the same time, setting a new precedent for long term benefits that can be achieved under the Clean Air Act.
But here's the kicker: VW's gasoline-powered engines (often called TSI) have been slowly catching up with the diesels in
The settlement would be the largest ever automotive buyback offer in U.S. history and most expensive auto industry scandal.
The cars used sophisticated software to evade U.S. emission rules.
Our decision to purchase the Jetta was heavily influenced by VW's promotion of their vehicles as "clean diesel." They suggested that VW's diesels were as efficient and clean as many hybrid cars. By installing a defeat device, VW was able to bypass regulators and fool us into purchasing a car we otherwise would never have bought.
"This case has ingredients I've spent my life working on."
Looking at why and how VW committed the fraud is also an opportunity to examine practices related to environmental monitoring in the automotive industry and whether the reaction to the scandal is really likely to prevent another one from occurring.